Related to: 'The Impossible: On the Run'

Robert Muchamore speaks to Graham Marks

Interview with Robert Muchamore

For official reasons the characters in Robert Muchamore’s award-winning Cherub and Henderson’s Boys series don’t exist. The man behind these worldwide bestsellers certainly does, and here he talks to Graham Marks about writing, research and how he came to create the shadowy, sometimes savage and very real world of Charles Henderson…

Quercus Children's Books

The Impossible

Mark Illis, Bimpe Alliu
Contributors:
Mark Illis, Bimpe Alliu

When Hector Coleman and his mates genetically mutate overnight, his life changes in impossible ways. A comic-book inspired adventure with a graphic novel twist for fans of Joe Cowley, Joe Sugg and Charlie Higson.Hector Coleman. Just your average angst-ridden teenager, living a normal rubbish life in a normal rubbish town with, let's face it, a rubbish name. Until his mates start genetically mutating ... and everything changes. Apart from his name. And his girl trouble. And his embarrassingly low number of Twitter followers. All those things, unfortunately, stay the same. For now ...

Albert Uderzo

Albert Uderzo was born in 1927 in a small village in Marne, France. He met Rene Goscinny in 1951 and on 29 October 1959 their most famous creation, Asterix, made his first appearance on page 20 of Pilote. Asterix the Gaul, their first album, was published in 1961 and there have now been 34 Asterix albums.

C. G. Drews

C.G. Drews lives in Australia with her dog, a piano, and the goal of reading every book in existence. Consequently, her brain has overflowed with words and she spends her days writing novel after novel. She blogs at paperfury.com, never sleeps, and believes in cake for breakfast.

Carl Hiaasen

Carl Hiaasen was born and raised in Florida, where he lives today with his family. He has written many books, both for adults and younger readers. He writes a weekly column for the Miami Herald.

Cat Clarke

Cat Clarke is the bestselling, award-winning author of six YA novels. She was born in Zambia and brought up in Edinburgh and Yorkshire, which has given her an accent that tends to confuse people. She lives in Edinburgh with her partner, two ninja cats and two decidedly non-ninja cocker spaniels.

Catherine Fisher

Catherine Fisher is an award-winning fantasy writer and author of the New York Times bestseller Incarceron. The Oracle was shortlisted for the Whitbread Award 2003, The Conjuror's Game for the Smarties Award, The Snow-Walker's Son for the WH Smith Mind Boggling Award, The Candle Man won the Tir-Na-n'Og Award, and Corbenic was shortlisted. Author of many books for children and two volumes of award-winning poetry, she is particularly well-known in Wales and has been named as the first Welsh Young People's Laureate.

David Almond

David Almond is twice winner of the Whitbread Children's Book Award. His first novel, SKELLIG, won the Whitbread Children's Award and the Carnegie Medal and was made into a feature-length film on Sky1. His second, KIT'S WILDERNESS, won the Smarties Award Silver Medal, was Highly Commended for the Carnegie Medal, and shortlisted for the Guardian Award. THE FIRE-EATERS won the Whitbread, the Smarties Gold Award and was shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal, and CLAY was shortlisted for the Costa Children's Book Award, and the Carnegie Medal. A SONG FOR ELLA GRAY won the Guardian Children's Book Prize.David has also won the 2010 Hans Christian Andersen Award for his lasting contribution to children's literature and is widely regarded as one of the most exciting and innovative children's authors writing today. His books are bestsellers all over the world. He lives with his family in Northumberland. www.davidalmond.com

Eliza Wass

Eliza Wass is a freelance writer, editor and journalist. She comes from Southern California, where she was one of nine perfect children with two perfect parents. She has thousands of friends, all of whom either arrive inside dust jackets or post obsessively on Twitter.Eliza spent 7 years in London with the most amazing man in the world, her late husband, Alan Wass of Alan Wass and The Tourniquet, who inspired her to pursue her dreams and live every day of her life.

Enid Blyton

Enid Blyton's books have sold over 500 million copies and have been translated into other languages more often than any other children's author.She wrote over 600 books and hundreds of short stories, including favourites such as The Famous Five,The Secret Seven, The Magic Faraway Tree, Malory Towers and Noddy. Born in London in 1897, Enid lived much of her life in Buckinghamshire and adored dogs, gardening and the countryside. She died in 1968 but remains one of the world's best-loved storytellers.

Jerry Spinelli

Jerry Spinelli started out wanting to be a cowboy. Luckily for young readers, he later decided to become a writer, even though he's still not sure he can call himself one (he does other things too, like picking berries and skipping stones).

Juno Dawson

Juno Dawson - formerly known as James - grew up in West Yorkshire, writing imaginary episodes of DOCTOR WHO. She later turned her talent to journalism, interviewing bands before writing for a Brighton newspaper. Until recently, Juno worked as a teacher, specialising in PSHE. She is most proud of her work surrounding anti-bullying and family diversity. In 2014 she became a School Role Model for the charity STONEWALL. In 2015, Juno announced her intention to undergo gender transition and live as a woman.Visit Juno's website at www.junodawson.com

Kate O'Hearn

Kate O'Hearn was raised in the heart of New York City. Throughout her life, she has always had an active and vivid imagination. As a child walking down Fifth Avenue, she would envision herself soaring among the city's canyons on the back of a wild dragon. While in Florida, looking over the sea, she could imagine living amongst the whales and breaching in the heavy swells. At night, a star studded sky was yet another playground. These dreams and ideas never faded. Instead they grew until they spilled over into the books she loves to write.Kate's first book, Shadow of the Dragon: Kira, won the 1066 Schools' Book Award.

Liz Kessler

Liz Kessler studied English at Loughborough University, has worked as a teacher and a journalist and has an MA in Creative Writing from Manchester Metropolitan University. After taking a year off to travel around Europe in a camper van, Liz now lives in Cornwall.Find out more at www.lizkessler.co.uk, follow her on Twitter @lizkesslerbooks and like her on Facebook at facebook.com/lizkesslerchildrensauthor.

Lydia Ruffles

After graduating with a degree in theatre and a postgraduate diploma in public relations, Lydia Ruffles spent a decade working in corporate communications in between travels. She is a graduate of the acclaimed Faber Academy and lives in London. The Taste of Blue Light is her first novel. Find her on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @lydiaruffles

Margaret Mahy

Margaret Mahy's many books - picture books, short stories, and fiction for teenagers as well as younger children - have been hugely successful all round the world and she is indisputably one of the most popular and successful twentieth-century children's authors. She has won the Carnegie Medal and many other awards, and has been nominated for the Hans Christian Andersen Award. She lived in New Zealand until her death in 2012.

Nicola Morgan

Nicola Morgan is an international speaker and award-winning author for and about teenagers. She has written nearly 100 books, including novels such as Fleshmarket (currently being adapted for the London stage) and Mondays are Red, but in the last twelve years she has become increasingly well known for her passionate factual work on adolescence, with Blame My Brain - The Amazing Teenage Brain Revealed and The Teenage Guide to Stress being seminal titles for teenagers and the adults who work with and care about them. A former teacher and dyslexia specialist, Nicola now writes and speaks around the world on a range of subjects relating to adolescence and wellbeing, as well as the reading brain, reading for pleasure and the effects of life online. Her positive, respectful and empathetic attitude towards young people naturally led her to write Positively Teenage.

Nikesh Shukla

Nikesh Shukla is the editor of British Book Award-shortlisted anthology The Good Immigrant, a collection of essays by British writers of colour about race and immigration in the UK. His debut novel, Coconut Unlimited, was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award. He has also written for The Guardian, Esquire, Buzzfeed, Vice, and BBC 2. Alongside his writing work, Nikesh edits Rife magazine, mentoring young writers and filmmakers and enabling them to tell their own stories in their own voices. He lives in Bristol with his family.

Rachel Anderson

Winner of the Guardian Children's Fiction Award for Paper Faces, Rachel Anderson has written more than 30 books for children of all ages. She excels at tackling life's difficult themes with a skilful blend of humour and sensitivity. Rachel has one daughter, three sons, two goldfish, several free-range muntjacs, and a delightful diversity of grandchildren.

Rebecca Sky

After graduating from high school, Rebecca Sky set out on a five-year, twenty-four-country exploration to find herself. She returned home captivated by the world and ready for another adventure: writing!

René Goscinny

Albert Uderzo has been illustrating Asterix for 37 years, and has written the most recent titles since Goscinny's death. He enjoys racing sports cars and owns a large number of Ferraris. He was the recipient of the Legion d'Honneur, France's highest honour, for services to the arts. Asterix is a best seller in 70 languages