Related to: 'Andy Riley'

Orchard Books

Grandma Dangerous and the Toe of Treachery

Kita Mitchell
Authors:
Kita Mitchell

WARNING: DO NOT GIVE THIS BOOK TO YOUR OWN GRANDMA. SHE MIGHT GET IDEAS...Danger is her middle name!**Actually, it's MaudeGrandma flies Ollie and Piper in her hot-air balloon for a cursed adventure in Cairo! The third book in the fantastically hilarious Grandma Dangerous series. Praise for Book 1: "Thrills! Biscuits! This book has it all" Andy Riley, author of King Flashypants

Orchard Books

Grandma Dangerous and the Egg of Glory

Kita Mitchell
Authors:
Kita Mitchell

WARNING: DO NOT GIVE THIS BOOK TO YOUR OWN GRANDMA. SHE MIGHT GET IDEAS...Grandma demands justice!**And also all the teacakesA priceless artefact has been stolen in Russia - and Grandma Dangerous wants to find it. Nothing will stand in her way - not even some poisoned caviar, a prison break or a spot of contemporary dance. Can Ollie and Grandma return the treasure and get back home, before being caught by the politsiya? Or - worse - before Mum finds out?Praise for Book 1: "Thrills! Biscuits! This book has it all" Andy Riley, author of King Flashypants

Hodder Children's Books

King Flashypants and the Snowball of Doom

Andy Riley
Authors:
Andy Riley

"Brilliantly original and hilarious. It's nearly as good as one of my books." DAVID WALLIAMS"Two words - such fun!" MIRANDA HART"It's gobstonkingly funny!" ULI, aged 7Great to read aloud with children of 5+ and perfect for newly independent readers of 7+.It's pretty nippy in Edwinland and Nurbisonia. In fact, it's the coldest winter in a hundred years! After evil Emperor Nurbison steals all his peasants' firewood and woolly hats just because he can, they go to live with nine-year-old King Edwin in Edwinland instead. The furious emperor talks the scary Ice Folk to join him in his latest dastardly plan to make life difficult for Edwin and his new peasants, but Edwin is determined not to let Nurbison get away with it. He is a noble king, after all!But Edwin has an extra problem to deal with - a voice of doubt in his head called Wendy Worry, who keeps telling him he's not up to the job of being king. How can he beat Emperor Nurbison AND Wendy Worry at the same time?

Orchard Books

Grandma Dangerous and the Dog of Destiny

Kita Mitchell, Nathan Reed
Contributors:
Kita Mitchell, Nathan Reed

WARNING: DO NOT GIVE THIS BOOK TO YOUR OWN GRANDMA. SHE MIGHT GET IDEAS...Danger is her middle name!Ollie's dad is missing - but Grandma Dangerous is on the case! She has a hot-air balloon, thirty packets of biscuits and a pooch with magical powers (she says).But as they sail through the skies, Ollie realises they're not just on a rescue mission...Grandma's on the run!"Thrills! Biscuits! This book has it all" Andy Riley, author of King Flashypants

Hodder Children's Books

King Flashypants and the Boo-Hoo Witches

Andy Riley
Authors:
Andy Riley
Hodder Children's Books

King Flashypants and the Toys of Terror

Andy Riley
Authors:
Andy Riley
Quercus Children's Books

Wilf the Mighty Worrier Rescues the Dinosaurs

Georgia Pritchett, Jamie Littler
Contributors:
Georgia Pritchett, Jamie Littler

Laugh your socks off with Wilf on a dino-tastic adventure! Perfect for fans of Tom Gates, David Baddiel, Danny Wallace and Phil Earle.Meet Wilf. He worries about everything. He is a Mighty Worrier. And now Wilf's evil next-door-neighbour Alan is determined to rule the world ... from the very beginning of time! But on the way to prehistoric Earth in Alan's time machine, Wilf is desperate for a wee, so they stop off in the 16th Century. There they meet Henry VIII - a very shouty man, who hitches a ride. Now Alan AND Henry want to be King of the World. Can Wilf stop them with the help of his new dinosaur friends?Join Wilf as he travels back in time to walk with dinosaurs and save the world from Alan ... again!Look out for more Wilf adventures: Wilf Saves the World, Wilf Battles a Pirate, Wilf is King of the Jungle, Wilf and the Alien Invasion.

Hodder Children's Books

King Flashypants and the Creature From Crong

Andy Riley
Authors:
Andy Riley
Hodder Children's Books

King Flashypants and the Evil Emperor

Andy Riley
Authors:
Andy Riley
Quercus Children's Books

Wilf the Mighty Worrier Battles a Pirate

Georgia Pritchett, Jamie Littler
Contributors:
Georgia Pritchett, Jamie Littler

Things Wilf was worried about before: 1. Lion dentists. 2. Creepy crawlies wearing wigs. 3. Marmite. Things Wilf is worried about now: 4. The most evil man in the world. 5. Anyone called Alan. 6. Alan deciding to become a pirate and destroy the world. Alan is Wilf's self-styled evil lunatic next-door-neighbour. He has a grumpy robot sidekick and a silent right-hand-dog, Kevin Phillips. He is ridiculous. But when Alan decides that pirating is an excellent way to destroy the world, Wilf knows he will have to overcome his fear of parrots and walking the plank to stop him...

Wayland

David Walliams

Sarah Levete
Authors:
Sarah Levete

Author, actor, comedian, charity fundraiser, TV talent show judge - David Walliams ticks all the boxes! Having shot to fame in TV comedy Little Britain, David has since won legions of fans, both for his appearances as a judge on Britain's Got Talent, and for his children's books, from Mr Stink to Demon Dentist and Gangsta Granny. Real-life Stories: David Walliams gives you the story behind this incredible man - from the schooldays that gave rise to his love of acting and writing, through his time at the National Youth Theatre, to the TV star he is today. It also looks at David's commitment to charity work - he has swum the English Channel and the full length of the River Thames, and cycled from John O'Groats to Lands End, all to raise money for Sport Relief. Biographical information, and David Walliams quotes, support the narrative. Punchy, fact-filled text make this a fantastic resource for biography based project work for children aged seven and above; a full glossary and index are included. Each title in the Real-life Stories series looks at a celebrity who is at the top of their game and the height of their career. We take a look at how they got to where they are today, what their daily life is like and where they are going next. If you've enjoyed reading about David Walliams, why not try finding out about Adele, Banksy, the Duchess of Cambridge, Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond, Brian Cox, Gary Barlow, Will.i.am, Steve Backshall, Stella McCartney, Alex Ferguson, Malorie Blackman or Kylie Minogue, in other titles in the series?

Orion Children's Books

The Cake the Wolf and the Witch

Maudie Smith
Authors:
Maudie Smith

Max doesn't believe in happy endings. He doesn't even like stories. So when he finds himself whisked away in a giant cake to The Land of Ever After, Max is NOT impressed. But the people of Ever After are in trouble, and they need Max's help. Will Max agree to go on a dangerous quest to save their world? And if he doesn't, how will he and his brand new brother and sister ever get home?A mixed-up and fresh take on the fairy tale, with a sprinkle of Jacqueline Wilson and Liz Kessler, and perfect for fans of Enid Blyton's The Magic Faraway Tree.'Endlessly inventive' - Piers Torday, award-winning author of The Last Wild.

Orion Children's Books

The Matchbox Mysteries

Sally Gardner, David Roberts
Contributors:
Sally Gardner, David Roberts

Podgy Bottom is in trouble. All over town cars are being shrunk to the size of a matchbox in the blink of an eye; a giant purple bunny rabbit is running riot and a strange-looking broomstick is causing chaos and calamity... Sounds like a case for Wings & Co, the famous fairy detective agency! Can Emily, Budget and Fidget put a stop to this magical mischief before it's too late?Another fantastic story for younger readers from Sally Gardner, winner of the COSTA BOOK AWARD 2013, and acclaimed artist, David Roberts. If you loved David Walliams's GANGSTA GRANNY, you'll love these hilarious tales of mischief, mayhem, magic and mystery.Read by Simon Russell Beale(P)2004 Orion Publishing Group.Ltd

Hodder Children's Books

Granny Grabbers' Daring Rescue

Charlotte Haptie, Pete Williamson
Contributors:
Charlotte Haptie, Pete Williamson

Delilah Smart's life hasn't been the same since childcare robot Granny Grabbers entered her world and made it whizz bang wonderful fun, no matter how determined her parents are to make it dull dull dull. And it's not long before Granny Grabbers and Delilah stumble upon their next adventure ...When local department store Blingman's hires an army of robotic cleaning personnel made by Happy Home Robotics, Granny Grabbers recognises a dear friend from her 'childhood' in the Happy Home Robotics Laboratory - PUG is clearly asking to be rescued from a life of cleaning servitude, and so it's action stations for Granny Grabbers and the team. Soon they devise a cunning plan that involves covert shopping trips, Easter bunny disguises, magic vanishing acts and a troupe of Paintball Pirates. And of course no daring rescue is complete without a grabbmobile ...

Caryl Hart

Caryl Hart is the author of many bestselling books for children, including the hugely successful How to Grow A Dinosaur and The Princess and the Peas. She is the winner of the Stockport Children's Book Award, the Sheffield Children's Book Award and the Lancashire Share a Story Award. Caryl lives on the top of a windy hill in the Peak District with her guitar-playing husband, two cheeky daughters, one extremely fluffy black cat, a goldfish, four hens and an invisible dog called Paddy.Follow Caryl at carylhart.com and @carylhart1

Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

David Melling

David Melling is the international bestselling author and illustrator who first came to our attention with the critically acclaimed The Kiss That Missed, and whose The Tale of Jack Frost went from page to animated TV feature, voiced by Hugh Laurie. Here he talks to Graham Marks about how he became a children’s book illustrator, his influences, his passions and why he loves Twitter…

Creator of Hugless Douglas speaks to Graham Marks

Interview with David Melling

David Melling is the international bestselling author and illustrator who first came to our attention with the critically acclaimed The Kiss That Missed, and whose The Tale of Jack Frost went from page to animated TV feature, voiced by Hugh Laurie. Here he talks to Graham Marks about how he became a children’s book illustrator, his influences, his passions and why he loves Twitter…

Georgia Pritchett

Georgia Pritchett is a comedy writer who has written for a number of TV comedies and comedians including The Thick Of It, Veep, Miranda, Have I Got News For You, Smack the Pony, Graham Norton, Jo Brand, Paul Merton, Lenny Henry, Ronnie Corbett, Wallace and Gromit and several other real, fictional and occasionally plasticine people. Wilf the Mighty Worrier is Georgia's first work for children. She lives in London with her partner and two children.

Giles Andreae speaks to Graham Marks

Author Spotlight

Giles Andreae is not only the bestselling author of such award-winning picture books as Giraffes Can’t Dance, Rumble in the Jungle and The Lion Who Wanted to Love, he’s also the man behind the entertaining world of Purple Ronnie, as well as The Interesting Thoughts of Edward Monkton. Here he talks to Graham Marks about all the many and varied bits of his very creative life, including toilet brush poetry.

Wikipedia

Anthony Horowitz

Anthony Horowitz (born 5 April 1955) is an English novelist and screenwriter. He has written many children's novels, including The Power of Five, Alex Rider and The Diamond Brothers series and has written over fifty books. He has also written extensively for television, adapting many of Agatha Christie'sHercule Poirot novels for the ITV series. He is the creator and writer of the ITV series Foyle's War, Midsomer Murders and Collision. Anthony Horowitz was born in 1955 in Middlesex, into a wealthy Jewish family, and in his early years lived an upper-class lifestyle.[2][3][4] As an overweight and unhappy child, Horowitz enjoyed reading books from his father's library. At the age of eight, Horowitz was sent to the boarding school Orley Farm in Harrow, Middlesex. There, he entertained his peers by telling them the stories he had read.[2] Horowitz described his time in the school as "a brutal experience", recalling that he was often beaten by the headmaster.[4] Horowitz's father acted as a "fixer" for prime minister Harold Wilson. Facing bankruptcy, he moved his assets into Swiss numbered bank accounts. He died from cancer when his son Anthony was 22, and the family was never able to track down the missing money despite years of trying.[4] Horowitz adored his mother, who introduced him to Frankenstein and Dracula. She also gave him a human skull for his 13th birthday. Horowitz said in an interview that it reminds him to get to the end of each story since he will soon look like the skull. From the age of eight, Horowitz knew he wanted to be a writer, realising "the only time when I'm totally happy is when I'm writing".[2] He graduated from the University of York with a BA in English literature in 1977.[5] In at least one interview, Horowitz claims to believe that H. P. Lovecraft based his fictional Necronomicon on a real text, and to have read some of that text.[6] Horowitz now lives in Central London with his wife Jill Green, whom he married in Hong Kong on 15 April 1988. Green produces Foyle's War, the series Horowitz writes for ITV. They have two sons, Nicholas Mark Horowitz (born 1989) and Cassian James Horowitz (born 1991). He credits his family with much of his success in writing, as he says they help him with ideas and research. Horowitz is a patron of child protection charity Kidscape.[7] Anthony Horowitz's first book, The Sinister Secret of Frederick K Bower, was a humorous adventure for children, published in 1979[8] and later reissued as Enter Frederick K Bower. In 1981 his second novel, Misha, the Magician and the Mysterious Amulet was published and he moved to Paris to write his third book.[9] In 1983 the first of the Pentagram series, The Devil's Door-Bell, was released. This story saw Martin Hopkins battling an ancient evil that threatened the whole world. Only three of four remaining stories in the series were ever written: The Night of the Scorpion (1984), The Silver Citadel (1986) and Day of the Dragon (1986). In 1985 he released Myths and Legends, a collection of retold tales from around the world. In between writing these novels, Horowitz turned his attention to legendary characters, working with Richard Carpenter on the Robin of Sherwood television series, writing five episodes of the third season. He also novelized three of Carpenter's episodes as a children's book under the title Robin Sherwood: The Hooded Man (1986). In addition, he created Crossbow (1987), a half-hour action adventure series loosely based on William Tell. In 1988, Groosham Grange was published. This book went on to win the 1989 Lancashire Children's Book of the Year Award.[10] It was partially based on the years Horowitz spent at boarding school. Its central character is a thirteen-year-old "witch", David Eliot, gifted as the seventh son of a seventh son. Like Horowitz's, Eliot's childhood is unhappy. The Groosham Grange books are aimed at a slightly younger audience than Horowitz's previous books. This era in Horowitz's career also saw Adventurer (1987) and Starting Out (1990) published. However, the most major release of Horowitz's early career was The Falcon's Malteser (1986). This book was the first in the successful Diamond Brothers series, and was filmed for television in 1989 as Just Ask for Diamond, with an all star cast that included Bill Paterson, Jimmy Nail, Roy Kinnear, Susannah York, Michael Robbins and Patricia Hodge, and featured Colin Dale and Dursley McLinden as Nick and Tim Diamond. It was followed in 1987 with Public Enemy Number Two, and by South by South East in 1991 followed by The French Confection, I Know What You Did Last Wednesday, The Blurred Man and most recently The Greek Who Stole Christmas. Horowitz wrote many stand-alone novels in the 1990s. 1994's Granny, a comedy thriller about an evil grandmother, was Horowitz's first book in three years, and it was the first of three books for an audience similar to that of Groosham Grange. The second of these was The Switch, a body swap story, first published in 1996. The third was 1997's The Devil and His Boy, which is set in the Elizabethan era and explores the rumour of Elizabeth I's secret son. In 1999, The Unholy Grail was published as a sequel to Groosham Grange. The Unholy Grail was renamed as Return to Groosham Grange in 2003, possibly to help readers understand the connection between the books. Horowitz Horror (1999) and More Horowitz Horror (2000) saw Horowitz exploring a darker side of his writing. Each book contains several short horror stories. Many of these stories were repackaged in twos or threes as the Pocket Horowitz series. Horowitz began his most famous and successful series in the new millennium with the Alex Rider novels. These books are about a 14-year-old boy becoming a spy, a member of the British Secret Service branch MI6. Currently, there are nine Alex Rider books: Stormbreaker (2000), Point Blanc (2001), Skeleton Key (2002), Eagle Strike (2003), Scorpia (2004) Ark Angel (2005), Snakehead (2007), Crocodile Tears (2009) and Scorpia Rising (2011). The seventh Alex Rider novel, Snakehead, was released on 31 October 2007,[11] and the eighth, Crocodile Tears, was released in the UK on 12 November 2009. The final Alex Rider book, Scorpia Rising, was released on 31 March 2011. Horowitz stated that Scorpia Rising was the last book in the Alex Rider series. He will however, write another novel about the life of Yassen Gregorovich entitled Yassen, which he will start writing in 2012. It will not be a part of the Alex Rider series.[12] In 2003, Horowitz also wrote three novels featuring the Diamond Brothers: The Blurred Man, The French Confection and I Know What You Did Last Wednesday, which were republished together as Three of Diamonds in 2004. The author information page in early editions of Scorpia and the introduction to Three of Diamonds claimed that Horowitz had travelled to Australia to research a new Diamond Brothers book, entitled Radius of the Lost Shark. However, this book has not been mentioned since, so it is doubtful it is still planned. A new Diamond Brothers "short" book entitled The Greek who Stole Christmas was later released. It is hinted at the end of The Greek who Stole Christmas that Radius of the Lost Shark may turn out to be the eighth book in the series.[13] In 2004, Horowitz branched out to an adult audience with The Killing Joke, a comedy about a man who tries to track a joke to its source with disastrous consequences. Horowitz's second adult novel, The Magpie Murders, was due out on 18 October 2006. However, that date passed with no further news on the book; all that is known about it is that it will be about "a whodunit writer who is murdered while he's writing his latest whodunit" and "it has an ending which I hope will come as a very nasty surprise".[14] As the initial release date was not met, it is not currently known if or when The Magpie Murders will be released. In August 2005, Horowitz released a book called Raven's Gate which began another series entitled The Power of Five (The Gatekeepers in the United States). He describes it as "Alex Rider with witches and devils".[15] The second book in the series, Evil Star, was released in April 2006. The third in the series is called Nightrise, and was released on 2 April 2007. The fourth book Necropolis was released in October 2008. The Power of Five is a rewritten, modern version of the Pentagram series from the 1980s.[citation needed] Although Pentagram required five books for story development, Horowitz completed only four: The Devil's Door-bell (Raven's Gate), The Night of the Scorpion (Evil Star), The Silver Citadel (Nightrise) and Day of the Dragon (Necropolis). Horowitz was clearly aiming for the same audience that read the Alex Rider novels with these rewrites, and The Power of Five has gained more public recognition than his earlier works, earning number 1 in the top 10 book chart.[2] In October 2008, Anthony Horowitz's play Mindgame opened Off Broadway at the Soho Playhouse in New York City.[16]Mindgame starred Keith Carradine, Lee Godart, and Kathleen McNenny. The production was the New York stage directorial debut for Ken Russell. Recently he got into a joke dispute with Darren Shan over the author using a character that had a similar name and a description that fitted his. Although Horowitz considered suing, he decided not to.[17] In March 2009 he was a guest on Private Passions, the biographical music discussion programme on BBC Radio 3.[18] On 19 January 2011, the estate of Arthur Conan Doyle announced Horowitz was to be the writer of a new Sherlock Holmes novel, the first such effort to receive an official endorsement from them and to be entitled The House of Silk. It was both published[19][20][21] in November 2011 and broadcast on BBC Radio 4.[22] In August 2012 Horowitz was interviewed by BAFTA Kids' Vote and he gave his top 5 tips for young and aspiring writers. They were to read more, write more, go out and have adventures, believe in yourself and to enjoy your writing.[23] Horowitz began writing for television in the 1980s, contributing to the children's anthology series Dramarama, and also writing for the popular fantasy series Robin of Sherwood. His association with murder mysteries began with the adaptation of several Hercule Poirot stories for ITV's popular Agatha Christie's Poirot series during the 1990s. Often his work has a comic edge, such as with the comic murder anthology Murder Most Horrid (BBC Two, 1991) and the comedy-drama The Last Englishman (1995), starring Jim Broadbent. From 1997, he wrote the majority of the episodes in the early series of Midsomer Murders. In 2001, he created a drama anthology series of his own for the BBC, Murder in Mind, an occasional series which deals with a different set of characters and a different murder every one-hour episode. He is also less-favourably known for the creation of two short-lived and sometimes derided science-fiction shows, Crime Traveller (1997) for BBC One and The Vanishing Man (pilot 1996, series 1998) for ITV. While Crime Traveller received favourable viewing figures it was not renewed for a second season, which Horowitz accounts to temporary personnel transitioning within the BBC. It has, however, attracted somewhat of a cult following.[citation needed] The successful 2002 launch of the detective series Foyle's War, set during the Second World War, helped to restore his reputation as one of Britain's foremost writers of popular drama.[citation needed] He devised the 2009 ITV crime drama Collision and co-wrote the screenplay with Michael A. Walker. Horowitz is the writer of a feature film screenplay, The Gathering, which was released in 2002 and starred Christina Ricci. He wrote the screenplay for Alex Rider's first major motion picture, Stormbreaker. In an interview with BBC Radio 5 on 6 April 2011, Horowitz announced that he was writing the sequel to Steven Spielberg's Tintin: Secret of the Unicorn. The sequel is rumoured to be based on the Tintin comic Prisoners of the Sun and directed by Peter Jackson, who produced the first film.