Related to: 'Kevin Pettman'

Wayland

Dinosaur Bones and Fossils

Katie Woolley
Authors:
Katie Woolley

Did you know that fossilised dinosaur poo can reveal all sorts of interesting information about a dinosaurs diet and eating habits? Explore the world of bones and fossils in Dinosaurs Bones and Fossils. Learn about their special features, how much they ate and when they lived... You'll find out all kinds of fascinating facts about these fierce and violent beasts. The Dinosaur Infosaurus series presents to you pre-historic beasts in all their terrifying glory, with realistic artwork alongside digestible chunks of information presented as infographics. Perfect for readers aged 7+.

Wayland

A Guide to Space

Kevin Pettman
Authors:
Kevin Pettman

Think you know everything there is to know about space? Think again! This fact-packed bumper book is filled with everything you ever wanted to know about space ... and more! Using vivid colours, graphic visuals and bold designs, this guide brings space to life on the page with a modern and engaging approach to information.

Wayland

This is Australia

Kevin Pettman
Authors:
Kevin Pettman

Did you know ... Australia has more beaches than any other country in the world? Over 22 million jars of Vegemite are sold every year. Just one of Australia's deserts is nearly three times the size of England. And it is home to around 60 million kangaroos!Find out everything you ever wanted to know about Australia, from its amazing landscapes and fascinating wildlife to the country's most famous sports people and important dates in history. This glorious guide book is brought to life in bold, bright graphics, maps and fun visuals. A real treat for curious kids and a perfect travel guide for holidays!

Wayland

A Guide to Britain and Ireland

Kevin Pettman
Authors:
Kevin Pettman
Wayland

An Infographic Guide to Football

Kevin Pettman
Authors:
Kevin Pettman

Football is the most popular sport in the world, and this infographic guide is the perfect way to take children's love of the sport beyond the pitch. Whether they want to know who the referee is who has given the most red cards, the name of the most successful international goal scorer, or more about the father of modern football, then it's all here! Opening with the history of the game and the major European leagues, including Serie A, Bundesliga and the FA Cup, then moving on to the larger competitions, from the Africa Cup of Nations, Copa América and Champions League, to the ultimate decider - the World Cup, this book has it all! Then take a closer look at the stadiums, players, money, fans, technology and emerging game in Asia to round off your knowledge of all aspects of the sport. Using vivid colours, graphic visuals and bold designs, this guide brings football to life on the page with a modern and engaging approach to information.

Wayland

Refugees and Migrants

Ceri Roberts, Hanane Kai
Contributors:
Ceri Roberts, Hanane Kai
Orion Children's Books

Chimp Rescue

Jess French
Authors:
Jess French

Keep wildlife in the wild! Join Born Free behind the scenes of an amazing primate rescue, as they invite you to share in their incredible story. This is the story of Chinoise, the baby chimpanzee who was rescued by Born Free and their supporters in 2014. After spending her early life isolated and in captivity, Chinoise now lives in a special nursery for rescued primates where, at last, she has made friends and learned how to play. Join Born Free behind the scenes of one of their real life rescues.

Orchard Books

Going to Nursery

Laurence Anholt, Catherine Anholt
Contributors:
Laurence Anholt, Catherine Anholt

Anna is a bit worried about starting nursery. She doesn't want to leave her mummy and she won't know anyone there ... But soon Anna is having lots of fun, painting, dressing up and playing with new friends!Starting nursery school is an exciting but anxious time for every family, and sharing this book together is the perfect way to prepare for the big day. The simple, reassuring story covers meeting the teacher, snack-time, going to the loo, making friends and doing all sorts of fun activities. So your little one will know just what to expect on their first day.

Orion Children's Books

My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece

Annabel Pitcher
Authors:
Annabel Pitcher
Hodder Children's Books

Secrets and Surprises

Emma Thomson
Authors:
Emma Thomson
Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

David Melling

David Melling is the international bestselling author and illustrator who first came to our attention with the critically acclaimed The Kiss That Missed, and whose The Tale of Jack Frost went from page to animated TV feature, voiced by Hugh Laurie. Here he talks to Graham Marks about how he became a children’s book illustrator, his influences, his passions and why he loves Twitter…

Creator of Hugless Douglas speaks to Graham Marks

Interview with David Melling

David Melling is the international bestselling author and illustrator who first came to our attention with the critically acclaimed The Kiss That Missed, and whose The Tale of Jack Frost went from page to animated TV feature, voiced by Hugh Laurie. Here he talks to Graham Marks about how he became a children’s book illustrator, his influences, his passions and why he loves Twitter…

Submission Guidelines

Hodder Children's Books Press Release

Join Enid Blyton’s Secret Seven on their latest mission to get more families reading together at McDonald’s

Get your magnifying glasses and code breakers at the ready, the Secret Seven are coming to McDonald’s!

Updated June 2017

Our Ethical and Environmental Policy

Our ethical and environmental policy

Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

Sarah Mussi

Sarah Mussi started out with every intention of following a carer as an artist; that did not turn out to be what happened, and now she is now an award-winning and critically acclaimed YA author - as well as being a teacher. Here she talks to Graham Marks about her fascinating and well-travelled life, and the story behind her latest novel, Siege…

Wendy Cooling

After a varied career and two years drifting around the world, Wendy settled down to teaching and worked in Inner London Secondary Schools as an English teacher, later deputy and acting-head-teacher. During that time Wendy was seconded to the ILEA learning Resources Branch as an advisory teacher to help schools and colleges - infant to FE - set up library resource centres and to develop independent styles of learning. Wendy studied at London University's Institute of Education for an MA and wrote a dissertation on the role of the school library in curriculum development.At the end of 1990 Wendy left teaching to run The Children's Book Foundation (now Book Trust). This involved Wendy in talking and writing about children's books and reading, organising National Children's Book Week, overseeing the annual production of Children's Books of the Year and working on a range of projects to promote reading. One of the most interesting was Bookstart, which aims to encourage parents and carers to read to their children from a very early age. It is run in co-operation with local health centres and public libraries and involves the gift of books, and a pack about reading, to families taking babies to the health centre for the 7-9 month health check. Wendy currently works freelance but continues to act as Senior Consultant to Bookstart, now a national project. This has given her many opportunities to speak on radio and TV and at conferences, about pre-school reading. In 2003 Wendy visited Thailand and South Korea to launch Bookstart projects and to lecture on early reading.At the other end of the age range Wendy has worked on many projects on teenage reading with teachers, librarians and parents and has talked on the subject on such radio programmes as Women's Hour, Treasure Islands, Front Row and Open Book.Wendy now works as a consultant to a range of children's publishers, reviews books, runs in-service training sessions for teachers and librarians, makes presenta

Wikipedia

Shaun Tan

Shaun Tan (born 1974) is an Australian illustrator and author of children's books and speculative fiction cover artist. He won an Academy Award for the The Lost Thing, a 2011 animated film adaptation of a 2000 picture book he wrote and illustrated. Beside The Lost Thing, The Red Tree and The Arrival are chapterbooks he has written and illustrated. Tan was born in Fremantle, Western Australia in 1974 and, after freelancing for some years from a studio at Mount Lawley, relocated to Melbourne, Victoria in 2007.[1] In 2006, his wordless graphic novelThe Arrival won the "Book of the Year" prize as part of the New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards.[2] The same book won the Children's Book Council of Australia "Picture Book of the Year" award in 2007.[3] and the Western Australian Premier's Book Awards Premier's Prize in 2006.[4] Tan was the University of Melbourne's Department of Language Literacy and Arts Education Illustrator In Residence for two weeks through an annual Fellowship offered by the May Gibbs Children’s Literature Trust.[5] In 2010, Shaun Tan was the Artist Guest of Honour at the 68th World Science Fiction Convention held in Melbourne, Australia. For his career contribution to "children's and young adult literature in the broadest sense" Tan won the 2011 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award from the Swedish Arts Council, the biggest prize in children's literature.[6] As a boy, Tan spent time illustrating poems and stories and drawing dinosaurs, robots and spaceships. At school he was known as a talented artist.[1] At the age of eleven, he became a fan of The Twilight Zone television series as well as books that bore similar themes. Tan cites Ray Bradbury as a favorite at this time. These stories led to Tan writing his own short stories. Of his effort at writing as a youth, Tan tells, "I have a small pile of rejection letters as testament to this ambition!"[7] Eventually he gained success with his illustrations. At the age of sixteen, Tan's first illustration appeared in the Australian magazine Aurealis in 1990.[7] Tan almost studied to become a geneticist, and enjoyed chemistry, physics, history and English when in high school as well as art and claimed that he did not really know what he wanted to do, even at university.[7] University studies were taking him along an academic route until he "decided to stop studying and try working as an artist."[8] Illustration was something Tan enjoyed. The decision to choose it as a career simply allowed him to make a living from drawing and painting.[8] Drawing was something he had never stopped doing, claiming "...it was one thing I could do better than anyone else when I was in school."[7] Tan claims that he had little formal training in the field of book illustration.[1] Tan attended Balcatta Senior High School in the northern suburbs of Perth where he was enrolled in a special art program for gifted and talented students. "The main advantage," cites Tan, "was that students came to be taught by a wide range of practising artists, not just art teachers."[8] He completed the program in 1991 and he "credits the...Program [for] providing him the fundamental skills of art making." [9] Tan continued his education at the University of Western Australia where he studied Fine Arts, English Literature and History. While this was of interest to him, there was little studio practice involved.[8] In 1995, he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts.[10] Of his actual works he has said: ‘‘I don’t think I’ve ever painted an image as a reproduction of what I’m seeing, even when I’m working in front of it. I’m always trying to create some kind of parallel equivalent."[7] Originally, Tan worked in black and white because the final reproductions would be printed that way and this preference extended to The Stray Cat. Some black and white mediums he used included pens, inks, acrylics, charcoal, scraperboard, photocopies and linocuts.[7] Tan's current colour works still begin as monochromatic. He uses a graphite pencil to make sketches on ordinary copy paper. The sketches are then reproduced numerous times with different versions varying with parts added or removed. Sometimes scissors are used for this purpose. The cut and paste collage idea in these early stages often extend to the finished production with many of his illustrations using such materials as "glass, metal, cuttings from other books and dead insects."[7] Tan describes himself as a slow worker who revises his work many times along the way. He is interested in loss and alienation, and believes that children in particular react well to issues of natural justice. He feels he is "like a translator" of ideas, and is happy and flattered to see his work adapted and interpreted in film and music (such as by the Australian Chamber Orchestra).[11] Tan draws from a large source of inspiration and cites many influences on his work. His comment on the subject is: "I’m pretty omnivorous when it comes to influences, and I like to admit this openly."[7] Some influences are very direct. The Lost Thing is a strong example where Tan makes visual references to famous artworks. Many of his influences are a lot more subtle visually, some of the influences are ideological. Below are some influences he has named in various interviews: The Shaun Tan Award for Young Artists is sponsored by the City of Subiaco and open to all Perth school children between 5 and 17 years. The award is aimed at encouraging creativity in two-dimensional works. It is held annually with award winners announced in May and finalists' works exhibited at the Subiaco Library (crn Rokeby and Bagot Road, Subiaco) throughout June.[13] Mural in the Children's Section of the Subiaco Public Library (Perth, Western Australia). Size: 20 square metres[1]

Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

HL Dennis

HL Dennis is the author of the six-book ‘Unlock the Truth’ Secret Beakers series, the fourth of which, Tower of the Winds, has just been published. Here she talks to Graham Marks about how the series came about, how she writes and what it’s like to live in a world of codes and clues. As far as we can tell, there are no hidden messages in any of her answers…

Laurence Anholt

Laurence and Catherine Anholt live and work in a house and studios on top of a hill above the sea in Devon. They started making picture books in 1984 when their first daughter was born. Since then they have made more than 200 classic picture books, which are published all over the world in more than 30 languages. Their titles range from their Orchard picture book series which include Babies Love Books and Billy and the Big New School; to Laurence's self-illustrated Anholt's Artists series, an introduction to great artists for young children, which include Camille and the Sunflowers. Laurence also collaborates with his friend, the illustrator, Arthur Robins on the bestselling Seriously Silly Stories, which include the Nestlé Smarties Gold Award winner Snow White and the Seven Aliens.The Anholts' books have won many awards and are frequently featured on television and radio. Babies, Babies, Babies is listed in The Sunday Times 100 Modern Classics. Laurence was included in the Independent on Sunday's Top 10 Children's Authors in the UK and was described as 'one of the most versatile authors writing for children today'. Laurence was brought up mainly in Holland where he developed a lasting passion for art. He then went on to study Fine Art for eight years, finishing with a Master's Degree from the Royal Academy of Art in London.The Anholts have been closely involved with a number of literacy schemes such as the UK Government funded Bookstart scheme, which encourages parents to share books with babies from the earliest possible age. Their work has taken them inside Buckingham Palace and Downing Street on many occasions. Recent projects include a full-scale stage musical in Korea. Laurence and Catherine have three grown up children: Claire works for the UN in New York, Tom Anholt is a painter living in Berlin and Maddy is an actor based in London. Laurence's favourite things include, 'my lovely family, travelling to wild places and anything to do with art'. The best way to relax? 'A long soak in a warm book.'