Related to: 'Mike Gordon'

Wayland

How Do Plants Grow?

Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon
Wayland

What is Sound?

Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon

This lovely picturebook story tells the story of two children who find out about sound.Ideal for home or classroom, this book contains notes for parents and teachers with suggestions of ways to explore scientific topicsIllustrated by the ever-popular and award-winning illustrator Mike Gordon.This book is part of a series of stories about feelings and emotions for children aged between 4 and 8. Other titles are: What are plants? What is light and sound? What is electricity? What are materials?

Wayland

What is light?

Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon

This lovely picturebook story tells the story of two children who find out what light is.Ideal for home or classroom, this book contains notes for parents and teachers with suggestions of ways to explore scientific topicsIllustrated by the ever-popular and award-winning illustrator Mike Gordon.This book is part of a series of stories about feelings and emotions for children aged between 4 and 8. Other titles are: What are plants? What are forces? What is electricity? What are materials?

Wayland

What are Materials?

Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon

This lovely picturebook story tells the story of two children who find out what materials are.Ideal for home or classroom, this book contains notes for parents and teachers with suggestions of ways to explore scientific topicsIllustrated by the ever-popular and award-winning illustrator Mike Gordon.This book is part of a series of stories about feelings and emotions for children aged between 4 and 8. Other titles are: What are plants? What is light and sound? What is electricity? What are materials?

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What is Electricity?

Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon
Wayland

What are Forces?

Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Kay Barnham, Mike Gordon
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I Feel Jealous

Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
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I Don't Care - Learning About Respect

Brian Moses
Authors:
Brian Moses
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Samuel Scaredosaurus

Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Brian Moses, Mike Gordon

Samuel Scaredosaurus was scared of lots of things. He was scared of spiders, strange noises, dark shadows and being left on his own. Would he ever be able to face his fears?Written by Brian Moses, this humorous picture book explores different things that might scare children, for example shadows and noises in the dark, being lost, bullies, fairground rides, going to school and heights. Different ways of dealing with these fears are then set out showing that there are ways to cope with these, sometimes overwhelming, emotions.The clever and funny illustrations, by internationally renowned illustrator, Mike Gordon, bring a light-touch to these stories, helping children to learn about their feelings in a fun and light-hearted way.Excellent notes for parents and teachers at the back of this book show how to approach these issues with children.Other books by Brian Moses and Mike Gordon: I Feel Frightened; I Feel Angry; I Feel Jealous; I Feel Sad; It's Not Fair; I Feel Bullied; William Worrydactyl; Gracie Grumposaurus; Jamal Jealousaurus; Anna Angrysaurus; Sophie Shyosaurus.

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Sophie Shyosaurus

Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Brian Moses, Mike Gordon

Sophie Shyosaurus was a very shy dinosaur. She got embarrassed at parties, when she met someone new, or if she had to stand up and talk in school. Will she ever be able to stop being shy? Written by Brian Moses, this humorous picture book explores different things that might make children feel shy, for example being asked to speak in class, going to a party or doing something new. Different ways of dealing with shyness are then set out with mum and dad dinosaur explaining how they sometimes are shy too and giving examples of how they try to overcome these feelings. The clever and funny illustrations, by internationally renowned illustrator, Mike Gordon, bring a light-touch to these stories, helping children to learn about their feelings in a fun and light-hearted way. Excellent notes for parents and teachers at the back of this book show how to approach these issues with children. Other books by Brian Moses and Mike Gordon: I Feel Frightened; I Feel Angry; I Feel Jealous; I Feel Sad; It's Not Fair; I Feel Bullied; William Worrydactyl; Gracie Grumposaurus; Jamal Jealousaurus; Anna Angrysaurus; Samuel Scaredosaurus.

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Anna Angrysaurus

Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
Wayland

Jamal Jealousaurus

Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Brian Moses, Mike Gordon

Gracie Grumposaurus is a very grumpy dinosaur. From first thing in the morning until last thing at night, Gracie is a grump! Her parents try everything to cheer her up, but nothing works. Will anything make her smile?If you've got a child who's feeling sad or struggles with bad moods, this book will surely cheer them up. Written by Brian Moses, this funny picture book explores different things that might make children grumpy and sad, such as getting up early, not getting their favourite food or being bored. Different ways of dealing with these situations are explored, helping children to understand that it's okay to be grumpy, but that they shouldn't take their feelings out on other people - and that there are strategies to help you come out of a 'grump'. The clever and funny illustrations, by internationally renowned illustrator Mike Gordon, bring a light touch to the story, helping children to learn about their feelings in a fun and light-hearted way.Includes excellent notes for parents and teachers on how to share this book to help children learn about their feelings and emotions. Other books by Brian Moses and Mike Gordon: I Feel FrightenedI Feel AngryI Feel JealousI Feel SadIt's Not FairI Feel BulliedWilliam WorrydactylSamuel ScaredosaurusJamal JealousaurusAnna AngrysaurusSophie Shyosaurus

Wayland

Say No to Bullying

Louise Spilsbury, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Louise Spilsbury, Mike Gordon

Bullying today comes in many forms, from being picked on to verbal, physical, emotional, homophobic, racist and cyberbullying. This book examines all the types of bullying, looks at the reasons people bully and the variety of ways that you can combat bullying. With endorsement from Kidscape, the children's charity against abuse and bullying.

Wayland

I Feel Bullied

Jen Green, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Jen Green, Mike Gordon

Young children experience many confusing emotions in their early years and I feel Bullied looks at what it means and feels like to be bullied in light-hearted but ultimately reassuring way. This picture books examines how and why people are bullied, illustrates scenarios of people bullying and being bullied, and the best way to deal with it with age-appropriate content.Ideal for home or the classroom, this book contains notes for parents and teachers with suggestions of ways to help children deal with bullying.Filled with colourful illustrations by the every-popular, award-winning illustrator Mike Gordon.

Wayland

I Feel Angry

Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
Wayland

I Feel Frightened

Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
Wayland

I Feel Sad

Brian Moses, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Brian Moses, Mike Gordon

Young children experience many confusing emotions in their early years and I feel Sad looks at sadness, in light-hearted but ultimately reassuring way. This picture book examines how and why people feel sad, illustrates scenarios of people feeling sad and upset, and the best way to deal with it with age-appropriate content.Ideal for home or the classroom, this book contains notes for parents and teachers with suggestions of ways to help children deal with being sad.Filled with colourful illustrations by the every-popular, award-winning illustrator Mike Gordon.

Wikipedia

Anthony Horowitz

Anthony Horowitz (born 5 April 1955) is an English novelist and screenwriter. He has written many children's novels, including The Power of Five, Alex Rider and The Diamond Brothers series and has written over fifty books. He has also written extensively for television, adapting many of Agatha Christie'sHercule Poirot novels for the ITV series. He is the creator and writer of the ITV series Foyle's War, Midsomer Murders and Collision. Anthony Horowitz was born in 1955 in Middlesex, into a wealthy Jewish family, and in his early years lived an upper-class lifestyle.[2][3][4] As an overweight and unhappy child, Horowitz enjoyed reading books from his father's library. At the age of eight, Horowitz was sent to the boarding school Orley Farm in Harrow, Middlesex. There, he entertained his peers by telling them the stories he had read.[2] Horowitz described his time in the school as "a brutal experience", recalling that he was often beaten by the headmaster.[4] Horowitz's father acted as a "fixer" for prime minister Harold Wilson. Facing bankruptcy, he moved his assets into Swiss numbered bank accounts. He died from cancer when his son Anthony was 22, and the family was never able to track down the missing money despite years of trying.[4] Horowitz adored his mother, who introduced him to Frankenstein and Dracula. She also gave him a human skull for his 13th birthday. Horowitz said in an interview that it reminds him to get to the end of each story since he will soon look like the skull. From the age of eight, Horowitz knew he wanted to be a writer, realising "the only time when I'm totally happy is when I'm writing".[2] He graduated from the University of York with a BA in English literature in 1977.[5] In at least one interview, Horowitz claims to believe that H. P. Lovecraft based his fictional Necronomicon on a real text, and to have read some of that text.[6] Horowitz now lives in Central London with his wife Jill Green, whom he married in Hong Kong on 15 April 1988. Green produces Foyle's War, the series Horowitz writes for ITV. They have two sons, Nicholas Mark Horowitz (born 1989) and Cassian James Horowitz (born 1991). He credits his family with much of his success in writing, as he says they help him with ideas and research. Horowitz is a patron of child protection charity Kidscape.[7] Anthony Horowitz's first book, The Sinister Secret of Frederick K Bower, was a humorous adventure for children, published in 1979[8] and later reissued as Enter Frederick K Bower. In 1981 his second novel, Misha, the Magician and the Mysterious Amulet was published and he moved to Paris to write his third book.[9] In 1983 the first of the Pentagram series, The Devil's Door-Bell, was released. This story saw Martin Hopkins battling an ancient evil that threatened the whole world. Only three of four remaining stories in the series were ever written: The Night of the Scorpion (1984), The Silver Citadel (1986) and Day of the Dragon (1986). In 1985 he released Myths and Legends, a collection of retold tales from around the world. In between writing these novels, Horowitz turned his attention to legendary characters, working with Richard Carpenter on the Robin of Sherwood television series, writing five episodes of the third season. He also novelized three of Carpenter's episodes as a children's book under the title Robin Sherwood: The Hooded Man (1986). In addition, he created Crossbow (1987), a half-hour action adventure series loosely based on William Tell. In 1988, Groosham Grange was published. This book went on to win the 1989 Lancashire Children's Book of the Year Award.[10] It was partially based on the years Horowitz spent at boarding school. Its central character is a thirteen-year-old "witch", David Eliot, gifted as the seventh son of a seventh son. Like Horowitz's, Eliot's childhood is unhappy. The Groosham Grange books are aimed at a slightly younger audience than Horowitz's previous books. This era in Horowitz's career also saw Adventurer (1987) and Starting Out (1990) published. However, the most major release of Horowitz's early career was The Falcon's Malteser (1986). This book was the first in the successful Diamond Brothers series, and was filmed for television in 1989 as Just Ask for Diamond, with an all star cast that included Bill Paterson, Jimmy Nail, Roy Kinnear, Susannah York, Michael Robbins and Patricia Hodge, and featured Colin Dale and Dursley McLinden as Nick and Tim Diamond. It was followed in 1987 with Public Enemy Number Two, and by South by South East in 1991 followed by The French Confection, I Know What You Did Last Wednesday, The Blurred Man and most recently The Greek Who Stole Christmas. Horowitz wrote many stand-alone novels in the 1990s. 1994's Granny, a comedy thriller about an evil grandmother, was Horowitz's first book in three years, and it was the first of three books for an audience similar to that of Groosham Grange. The second of these was The Switch, a body swap story, first published in 1996. The third was 1997's The Devil and His Boy, which is set in the Elizabethan era and explores the rumour of Elizabeth I's secret son. In 1999, The Unholy Grail was published as a sequel to Groosham Grange. The Unholy Grail was renamed as Return to Groosham Grange in 2003, possibly to help readers understand the connection between the books. Horowitz Horror (1999) and More Horowitz Horror (2000) saw Horowitz exploring a darker side of his writing. Each book contains several short horror stories. Many of these stories were repackaged in twos or threes as the Pocket Horowitz series. Horowitz began his most famous and successful series in the new millennium with the Alex Rider novels. These books are about a 14-year-old boy becoming a spy, a member of the British Secret Service branch MI6. Currently, there are nine Alex Rider books: Stormbreaker (2000), Point Blanc (2001), Skeleton Key (2002), Eagle Strike (2003), Scorpia (2004) Ark Angel (2005), Snakehead (2007), Crocodile Tears (2009) and Scorpia Rising (2011). The seventh Alex Rider novel, Snakehead, was released on 31 October 2007,[11] and the eighth, Crocodile Tears, was released in the UK on 12 November 2009. The final Alex Rider book, Scorpia Rising, was released on 31 March 2011. Horowitz stated that Scorpia Rising was the last book in the Alex Rider series. He will however, write another novel about the life of Yassen Gregorovich entitled Yassen, which he will start writing in 2012. It will not be a part of the Alex Rider series.[12] In 2003, Horowitz also wrote three novels featuring the Diamond Brothers: The Blurred Man, The French Confection and I Know What You Did Last Wednesday, which were republished together as Three of Diamonds in 2004. The author information page in early editions of Scorpia and the introduction to Three of Diamonds claimed that Horowitz had travelled to Australia to research a new Diamond Brothers book, entitled Radius of the Lost Shark. However, this book has not been mentioned since, so it is doubtful it is still planned. A new Diamond Brothers "short" book entitled The Greek who Stole Christmas was later released. It is hinted at the end of The Greek who Stole Christmas that Radius of the Lost Shark may turn out to be the eighth book in the series.[13] In 2004, Horowitz branched out to an adult audience with The Killing Joke, a comedy about a man who tries to track a joke to its source with disastrous consequences. Horowitz's second adult novel, The Magpie Murders, was due out on 18 October 2006. However, that date passed with no further news on the book; all that is known about it is that it will be about "a whodunit writer who is murdered while he's writing his latest whodunit" and "it has an ending which I hope will come as a very nasty surprise".[14] As the initial release date was not met, it is not currently known if or when The Magpie Murders will be released. In August 2005, Horowitz released a book called Raven's Gate which began another series entitled The Power of Five (The Gatekeepers in the United States). He describes it as "Alex Rider with witches and devils".[15] The second book in the series, Evil Star, was released in April 2006. The third in the series is called Nightrise, and was released on 2 April 2007. The fourth book Necropolis was released in October 2008. The Power of Five is a rewritten, modern version of the Pentagram series from the 1980s.[citation needed] Although Pentagram required five books for story development, Horowitz completed only four: The Devil's Door-bell (Raven's Gate), The Night of the Scorpion (Evil Star), The Silver Citadel (Nightrise) and Day of the Dragon (Necropolis). Horowitz was clearly aiming for the same audience that read the Alex Rider novels with these rewrites, and The Power of Five has gained more public recognition than his earlier works, earning number 1 in the top 10 book chart.[2] In October 2008, Anthony Horowitz's play Mindgame opened Off Broadway at the Soho Playhouse in New York City.[16]Mindgame starred Keith Carradine, Lee Godart, and Kathleen McNenny. The production was the New York stage directorial debut for Ken Russell. Recently he got into a joke dispute with Darren Shan over the author using a character that had a similar name and a description that fitted his. Although Horowitz considered suing, he decided not to.[17] In March 2009 he was a guest on Private Passions, the biographical music discussion programme on BBC Radio 3.[18] On 19 January 2011, the estate of Arthur Conan Doyle announced Horowitz was to be the writer of a new Sherlock Holmes novel, the first such effort to receive an official endorsement from them and to be entitled The House of Silk. It was both published[19][20][21] in November 2011 and broadcast on BBC Radio 4.[22] In August 2012 Horowitz was interviewed by BAFTA Kids' Vote and he gave his top 5 tips for young and aspiring writers. They were to read more, write more, go out and have adventures, believe in yourself and to enjoy your writing.[23] Horowitz began writing for television in the 1980s, contributing to the children's anthology series Dramarama, and also writing for the popular fantasy series Robin of Sherwood. His association with murder mysteries began with the adaptation of several Hercule Poirot stories for ITV's popular Agatha Christie's Poirot series during the 1990s. Often his work has a comic edge, such as with the comic murder anthology Murder Most Horrid (BBC Two, 1991) and the comedy-drama The Last Englishman (1995), starring Jim Broadbent. From 1997, he wrote the majority of the episodes in the early series of Midsomer Murders. In 2001, he created a drama anthology series of his own for the BBC, Murder in Mind, an occasional series which deals with a different set of characters and a different murder every one-hour episode. He is also less-favourably known for the creation of two short-lived and sometimes derided science-fiction shows, Crime Traveller (1997) for BBC One and The Vanishing Man (pilot 1996, series 1998) for ITV. While Crime Traveller received favourable viewing figures it was not renewed for a second season, which Horowitz accounts to temporary personnel transitioning within the BBC. It has, however, attracted somewhat of a cult following.[citation needed] The successful 2002 launch of the detective series Foyle's War, set during the Second World War, helped to restore his reputation as one of Britain's foremost writers of popular drama.[citation needed] He devised the 2009 ITV crime drama Collision and co-wrote the screenplay with Michael A. Walker. Horowitz is the writer of a feature film screenplay, The Gathering, which was released in 2002 and starred Christina Ricci. He wrote the screenplay for Alex Rider's first major motion picture, Stormbreaker. In an interview with BBC Radio 5 on 6 April 2011, Horowitz announced that he was writing the sequel to Steven Spielberg's Tintin: Secret of the Unicorn. The sequel is rumoured to be based on the Tintin comic Prisoners of the Sun and directed by Peter Jackson, who produced the first film.

Giles Andreae speaks to Graham Marks

Author Spotlight

Giles Andreae is not only the bestselling author of such award-winning picture books as Giraffes Can’t Dance, Rumble in the Jungle and The Lion Who Wanted to Love, he’s also the man behind the entertaining world of Purple Ronnie, as well as The Interesting Thoughts of Edward Monkton. Here he talks to Graham Marks about all the many and varied bits of his very creative life, including toilet brush poetry.

Wikipedia

Shaun Tan

Shaun Tan (born 1974) is an Australian illustrator and author of children's books and speculative fiction cover artist. He won an Academy Award for the The Lost Thing, a 2011 animated film adaptation of a 2000 picture book he wrote and illustrated. Beside The Lost Thing, The Red Tree and The Arrival are chapterbooks he has written and illustrated. Tan was born in Fremantle, Western Australia in 1974 and, after freelancing for some years from a studio at Mount Lawley, relocated to Melbourne, Victoria in 2007.[1] In 2006, his wordless graphic novelThe Arrival won the "Book of the Year" prize as part of the New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards.[2] The same book won the Children's Book Council of Australia "Picture Book of the Year" award in 2007.[3] and the Western Australian Premier's Book Awards Premier's Prize in 2006.[4] Tan was the University of Melbourne's Department of Language Literacy and Arts Education Illustrator In Residence for two weeks through an annual Fellowship offered by the May Gibbs Children’s Literature Trust.[5] In 2010, Shaun Tan was the Artist Guest of Honour at the 68th World Science Fiction Convention held in Melbourne, Australia. For his career contribution to "children's and young adult literature in the broadest sense" Tan won the 2011 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award from the Swedish Arts Council, the biggest prize in children's literature.[6] As a boy, Tan spent time illustrating poems and stories and drawing dinosaurs, robots and spaceships. At school he was known as a talented artist.[1] At the age of eleven, he became a fan of The Twilight Zone television series as well as books that bore similar themes. Tan cites Ray Bradbury as a favorite at this time. These stories led to Tan writing his own short stories. Of his effort at writing as a youth, Tan tells, "I have a small pile of rejection letters as testament to this ambition!"[7] Eventually he gained success with his illustrations. At the age of sixteen, Tan's first illustration appeared in the Australian magazine Aurealis in 1990.[7] Tan almost studied to become a geneticist, and enjoyed chemistry, physics, history and English when in high school as well as art and claimed that he did not really know what he wanted to do, even at university.[7] University studies were taking him along an academic route until he "decided to stop studying and try working as an artist."[8] Illustration was something Tan enjoyed. The decision to choose it as a career simply allowed him to make a living from drawing and painting.[8] Drawing was something he had never stopped doing, claiming "...it was one thing I could do better than anyone else when I was in school."[7] Tan claims that he had little formal training in the field of book illustration.[1] Tan attended Balcatta Senior High School in the northern suburbs of Perth where he was enrolled in a special art program for gifted and talented students. "The main advantage," cites Tan, "was that students came to be taught by a wide range of practising artists, not just art teachers."[8] He completed the program in 1991 and he "credits the...Program [for] providing him the fundamental skills of art making." [9] Tan continued his education at the University of Western Australia where he studied Fine Arts, English Literature and History. While this was of interest to him, there was little studio practice involved.[8] In 1995, he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts.[10] Of his actual works he has said: ‘‘I don’t think I’ve ever painted an image as a reproduction of what I’m seeing, even when I’m working in front of it. I’m always trying to create some kind of parallel equivalent."[7] Originally, Tan worked in black and white because the final reproductions would be printed that way and this preference extended to The Stray Cat. Some black and white mediums he used included pens, inks, acrylics, charcoal, scraperboard, photocopies and linocuts.[7] Tan's current colour works still begin as monochromatic. He uses a graphite pencil to make sketches on ordinary copy paper. The sketches are then reproduced numerous times with different versions varying with parts added or removed. Sometimes scissors are used for this purpose. The cut and paste collage idea in these early stages often extend to the finished production with many of his illustrations using such materials as "glass, metal, cuttings from other books and dead insects."[7] Tan describes himself as a slow worker who revises his work many times along the way. He is interested in loss and alienation, and believes that children in particular react well to issues of natural justice. He feels he is "like a translator" of ideas, and is happy and flattered to see his work adapted and interpreted in film and music (such as by the Australian Chamber Orchestra).[11] Tan draws from a large source of inspiration and cites many influences on his work. His comment on the subject is: "I’m pretty omnivorous when it comes to influences, and I like to admit this openly."[7] Some influences are very direct. The Lost Thing is a strong example where Tan makes visual references to famous artworks. Many of his influences are a lot more subtle visually, some of the influences are ideological. Below are some influences he has named in various interviews: The Shaun Tan Award for Young Artists is sponsored by the City of Subiaco and open to all Perth school children between 5 and 17 years. The award is aimed at encouraging creativity in two-dimensional works. It is held annually with award winners announced in May and finalists' works exhibited at the Subiaco Library (crn Rokeby and Bagot Road, Subiaco) throughout June.[13] Mural in the Children's Section of the Subiaco Public Library (Perth, Western Australia). Size: 20 square metres[1]