Related to: 'Hanane Kai'

Pat-a-Cake

Here Comes Christmas

Pat-a-Cake, Hilli Kushnir
Contributors:
Pat-a-Cake, Hilli Kushnir

Clap hands and play with this range of exciting toddler touch-and-feel books!Here Comes Christmas is a playful touch-and-feel book, full of energy, fun and of course, lots of cute festive friends! Toddlers will laugh, shout, clap their hands and join in the fun as the simple text encourages them to point, count, match and talk about the friendly pals playing on every page. With textures to feel on every page and a matching game page at the end, everyone will want to clap hands for the favourite Christmas friends!Also available: Here Come the Monkeys, Here Come the Kittens, Here Come the Puppies, Here Come the Dinosaurs, Here Come the Chicks, Here Come the Bunnies, Here Come the Unicorns

Pat-a-Cake

Here Come the Monsters

Pat-a-Cake, Hilli Kushnir
Contributors:
Pat-a-Cake, Hilli Kushnir

Clap hands and play with this range of exciting toddler touch-and-feel books!Here Come the Monsters is a playful touch-and-feel book, full of energy, fun and of course, lots of funny monster friends! Toddlers will laugh, shout, clap their hands and join in the fun as the simple text encourages them to point, count and talk about the magical pals playing on every page. With textures to feel on every page and a fun matching game at the end, everyone will want to clap hands for the favourite monster friends!Also available: Here Come the Unicorns, Here Come the Mummies and Babies, Here Come the Mermaids, Here Come the Dragons

Pat-a-Cake

Here Come the Mummies and Babies

Pat-a-Cake, Hilli Kushnir
Contributors:
Pat-a-Cake, Hilli Kushnir

Clap hands and play with this range of exciting toddler touch-and-feel books!Here Come the Mummies and Babies is a playful touch-and-feel book, full of energy, fun and of course, lots of cute mummy and baby animals! Toddlers will laugh, shout, clap their hands and join in the fun as the simple text encourages them to point, count, match and talk about the friendly, fluffy pals playing on every page. With textures to feel on every page and a matching game page at the end, everyone will want to clap hands for the mummies and babies! Also available: Here Come the Monkeys, Here Come the Kittens, Here Come the Puppies, Here Come the Dinosaurs, Here Come the Chicks, Here Come the Bunnies

Pat-a-Cake

Here Come the Llamas

Pat-a-Cake, Laura Hambleton
Contributors:
Pat-a-Cake, Laura Hambleton

Clap hands and play with this range of exciting toddler touch-and-feel books!Here Come the Llamas is a playful touch-and-feel book, full of energy, fun and of course, lots of cute llamas! Toddlers will laugh, shout, clap their hands and join in the fun as the simple text encourages them to point, count, match and talk about the friendly, fluffy pals playing on every page. With textures to feel on every page and a matching game page at the end, everyone will want to clap hands for the llamas! Also available: Here Come the Monkeys, Here Come the Kittens, Here Come the Puppies, Here Come the Dinosaurs, Here Come the Chicks, Here Come the Bunnies, Here Come the Unicorns

Wayland

Poverty and Hunger

Louise Spilsbury, Hanane Kai
Contributors:
Louise Spilsbury, Hanane Kai

A beautiful picture book that explores what poverty and hunger are and how they affect children all over the worldSensitively illustrated by award-winning artist Hanane KaiThe Children in Our World picture book series helps children make sense of the larger issues and crises that dominate the news in a sensitive and appropriate manner. With relatable comparisons, carefully researched text and striking illustrations, children can begin to understand what poverty and hunger are, how they affect people in countries all over the world and how readers can help those affected. Where issues aren't appropriate to describe in words, award-winning illustrator, Hanane Kai, uses striking and sensitive illustrations help children visualise the people and situations impacted by poverty and hunger with images that are suited to their age and disposition.The series forms an excellent cross-curricular resource that looks at refugees, war, poverty and racism, and this book is ideal for tying into discussions on food, wealth and current affairs.Words and pictures combine to excellent effect ... an excellent way to develop empathy and understanding - Parents In Touch

Wren & Rook

The Great Fire of London

Emma Adams, James Weston Lewis
Contributors:
Emma Adams, James Weston Lewis

In 1666, London's citizens woke to see the skyline above their city's cramped wooden houses ablaze. The Great Fire of London is a hauntingly beautiful visual re-telling of one of the most well-known disasters in the city's history. To commemorate the 350th anniversary of the fire, powerful and sumptuous drawings from the new east London illustrator, James Weston Lewis, bring the events of November 1666 to life in this stunning gift book.Lewis's drawings take readers on a journey, from the single smouldering coal that falls out of the baker's oven to the swirling clouds of ash that engulf the city and then in to the very heart of the fire itself. As the pages turn, you can witness London burning to the ground and then rebuilding again. Children will love examining the rich detail of each spread, from the detailed city map to the drawings of London before, during and after the fire took hold. This book takes the dramatic historical information surrounding the Great Fire of London and transforms it into a breathtaking story that will transfix readers of all ages.

Wayland

Refugees and Migrants

Ceri Roberts, Hanane Kai
Contributors:
Ceri Roberts, Hanane Kai

The Children in Our World picture book series helps children make sense of the larger issues and crises that dominate the news in a sensitive and appropriate manner. With relatable comparisons, carefully researched text and striking illustrations, children can begin to understand who refugees and migrants are, why they've left their homes, where they live and what readers can do to help those in need. Where issues aren't appropriate to describe in words, Hanane Kai's striking and sensitive illustrations help children visualise who refugees and migrants are, in images that are suited to their age and disposition. The series forms an excellent cross-curricular resource that looks at refugees, war, poverty and racism making them ideal for tying into Refugee Week and discussions on current affairs.

Wayland

Global Conflict

Louise Spilsbury, Hanane Kai
Contributors:
Louise Spilsbury, Hanane Kai
Hodder Children's Books

Memorial

Gary Crew, Shaun Tan
Contributors:
Gary Crew, Shaun Tan

In 2014 the world will mark the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War. Internationally acclaimed author, Gary Crew, and multi-award-winning illustrator Shaun Tan have created a powerful picture book to help us all remember.When the soldiers return in 1918, a memorial tree is planted... 'Lest we forget'. But generations later, what do those who pause in the shadows of the tree's immense branches remember? A message we should never forget.Memorial serves as a reminder of the lessons to be gained from the past and examine the significance of conservation, respect and remembrance.

Orion Children's Books

She Is Not Invisible

Marcus Sedgwick
Authors:
Marcus Sedgwick

Prize-winning author Marcus Sedgwick explores obsession, trust and coincidence in this page-turning thriller about 16-year-old Laureth Peak's mission to find her missing father. A mission made all the more difficult by one fact: Laureth Peak is blind.Laureth's father is a writer. For years he's been trying, and failing, to write a novel about coincidence. His wife thinks he's obsessed. Laureth thinks he's on the verge of a breakdown. He's supposed to be doing research in Austria, so when his notebook shows up in New York, Laureth knows something is wrong.On impulse, she steals her mother's credit card and heads for the States, taking her strange little brother Benjamin with her. Reunited with the notebook, they begin to follow clues inside, trying to find their wayward father. But the challenges and threats that lie ahead are even tougher for Laureth than they would be for any other teenager - because Laureth has no vision to guide her.Also available as an audio book, read from braille by Anna Cannings.

Hodder Children's Books

Copycat Bear

Ellie Sandall
Authors:
Ellie Sandall

Perfect for any child who worries about being different, this beautiful story by new talent Ellie Sandall celebrates friendship and understanding.Mango is a little bird with a BIG problem. Her best bear friend Blue copies everything she does! But when Mango flies off in a huff, Blue can't follow and soon Mango starts to feel lonely... Where is her copycat bear?

Orchard Books

Cheer Up Your Teddy Emily Brown

Cressida Cowell, Neal Layton
Contributors:
Cressida Cowell, Neal Layton
Hodder Children's Books

The Red Tree

Shaun Tan
Authors:
Shaun Tan

A small child awakes to find blackened leaves falling from her bedroom ceiling, threatening to overwhelm her. 'Sometimes you wake up with nothing to look forward to...' As she wanders around a world that is complex, puzzling and alienating, she is overtaken by a myriad of feelings. Just as it seems all hope is lost, the girl returns to her bedroom to find that a tiny red seedling has grown to fill the room with warm light. Astonishing Australian artist, Shaun Tan's latest creation, The Red Tree, is a book about feelings - feelings that can not always be simply expressed in words. It is a series of imaginary landscapes conjured up by the wizardry of his masterful and miraculous art. As a kind of fable, The Red Tree seeks to remind us that, though some bad feelings are inevitable, they are always tempered by hope.

Hodder Children's Books

Lost Thing

Shaun Tan
Authors:
Shaun Tan

The Lost Thing is a humorous story about a boy who discovers a bizarre-looking creature whilst out collecting bottle-tops at the beach. Having guessed that it is lost, he tries to find out who owns it or where it belongs, but the problem is met with indifference by everyone else, who barely notice it's presence. Each is unhelpful in their own way; strangers, friends, parents all unwilling to entertain this uninvited interruption to day-to-day life. In spite of his better judgement, the boy feels sorry for this hapless creature, and attempts to find out where it belongs.Shaun Tan creates intricate collages filled with whimsical images, bright colors, and meaningful prose. He invites his readers to look at the world in a different way.

Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

David Melling

David Melling is the international bestselling author and illustrator who first came to our attention with the critically acclaimed The Kiss That Missed, and whose The Tale of Jack Frost went from page to animated TV feature, voiced by Hugh Laurie. Here he talks to Graham Marks about how he became a children’s book illustrator, his influences, his passions and why he loves Twitter…

Creator of Hugless Douglas speaks to Graham Marks

Interview with David Melling

David Melling is the international bestselling author and illustrator who first came to our attention with the critically acclaimed The Kiss That Missed, and whose The Tale of Jack Frost went from page to animated TV feature, voiced by Hugh Laurie. Here he talks to Graham Marks about how he became a children’s book illustrator, his influences, his passions and why he loves Twitter…

Anna Claybourne

Anna Claybourne has written over 150 children's books on all kinds of subjects, from sharks, black holes and splitting the atom to how to draw, Shakespeare's life, and Greek myths and legends. She knows a lot about conservation in the rain forests of Costa Rica as she once volunteered there for three months. She likes space, sewing and music, plays the trombone and loves going camping.

Wikipedia

Laurie Halse Anderson

Laurie Halse Anderson was born on October 23, 1961 in Potsdam, New York.[1] Anderson is a current American author, who writes for children and young adults. First recognized for her novel Speak, published in 1999, Anderson gained recognition for her artistic dealings with tough topics embedded with honesty. Anderson’s ability to creatively address often avoided issues allows her to be a safe outlet for young readers. The tough themes of her novels including rape, family dysfunctions, body issues and disorders, and high academic pressures often create controversial discussions surrounding her novels. Anderson takes her writing very seriously, though often wishing she could write about lighter topics. She believes in speaking directly to teenagers addressing “their real concerns, fears, and frustrations". Anderson reads every letter, every e-mail message, every post sent to her by teens from around the world and responds by writing about what these young people express as most important to them — even if they want take her to places dark and painful.”[2] As a student growing up in New York, near the border of Canada, under her parents, Reverend Frank and Joyce Halse, with younger sister, Lisa,[2] Laurie Halse Anderson showed early interest in writing, specifically during the second grade. Laurie loved reading, especially science fiction and fantasy as a teenager, yet, she never envisioned herself becoming a writer. Despite struggling with math, she thought she would eventually pursue the occupation of a doctor.[3] During Anderson’s senior year, at the age of sixteen, she moved out of her parent’s house and lived as an exchange student for thirteen months on a pig farm in Denmark. After her experience in Denmark, Anderson moved back home to begin working at a clothing store, making minimum wage. This pushed Laurie to decide to attend college.[3] While attending Onondaga Community College, Laurie worked on dairy farm, milking cows. After graduating, two years later, with her associates, she transferred to Georgetown University in 1981 and graduated in 1984 with her Bachelor’s degree in Languages and Linguistics.[3] Laurie Halse Anderson married her first husband, Greg Anderson, and in 1985, they had their first child, Stephanie Holcomb. Two years later, they had their second child, Meredith Lauren. Her marriage to Greg did not last, but they remain on good terms with Greg still editing her manuscripts today.[2] Years later, with Laurie Anderson’s move back to Mexico, New York, she rekindled feelings with her childhood sweetheart, Scot Larrabee. Anderson eventually married, and is still married to, Larrabee. Together, they blended their families of Anderson’s two daughters and Larrabee’s two children, Jessica and Christian. Anderson states that the blended family is the “greatest thing that has ever happened to her.”[2] Other than writing and spending time with her family, Laurie loves to run for therapeutic release. She finds that running assists in her career and personal life stating, "My writing goes better, I sleep better, I eat better, and I'm a nicer person. My husband is very supportive of this endeavor."[2] Anderson has competed in several local races with Scot now that her children are grown.[2] Anderson’s commitment to writing powerful, controversial and intensely serious content within her novel have led Anderson on a journey, acting as a voice for many young readers. “I get amazing letters from readers who tell me that one of my books helped them get through a tough time, and I know this is what I am meant to do.”[2] Anderson uses her own experience which often intertwines itself into the life of her characters. Because of this blurred line, Anderson often feels the empathy, emotion, and feelings of what her characters experience. With the intensity of encompassing herself in often dark places, Anderson states, “I survive the process of emotional immersion by remembering the kids who write to me, reminding myself how much more difficult it is for the teen readers who are struggling with these issues in real life. At least I have the option of walking away from a story. They do not.”[2] Laurie Halse Anderson began her career as a freelance journalist and worked at The Philadelphia Inquirer in the early years of her career.[4] During this time, Anderson also began to write children’s and young adult novels. Despite receiving stacks of rejection letters, in 1996 Anderson released her first children’s novel Ndito Runs,[5] based on Kenyan Olympic marathon runners who ran to and from school each day.[3] Later that same year, Anderson also had her story Turkey Pox published. This story was inspired by her daughter Meredith who on Thanksgiving broke out with chicken pox. Two years later in 1998, No Time For Mother’s Day, featuring the same characters as Turkey Pox was published.[3] During her early career, Anderson also wrote a few pieces of non-fiction. The first of her non-fiction projects was a book featuring Saudi Arabia written for children. Anderson received the unique experience of working directly with the Saudi Arabian embassy in Washington. Within this time, Anderson gained the unique perspective of learning significantly about another culture and faith. Anderson also co-authored a book about parenting shy children with Dr. Ward Swallow, bringing the genuine experiences she received with her own daughter Stephanie.[3] In 1999, Farrar, Straus and Giroux published what is arguably Anderson's most famous novel to date, Speak. It won numerous awards and was a New York Times best seller.[6]Speak was adapted into film in 2004, starring Kristen Stewart as Melinda Sordino.[7] Anderson's novel, Speak, became a finalist for the prestigious National Book Award. The 1999 novel won Anderson an array of honors for its searing portrayal of a thirteen-year-old girl who becomes mute after a sexual assault. The paperback version was published in 2001 by Puffin Books, an imprint of Penguin Publishing. Speak has been translated into 16 languages. In 2002 after the publication of Fever, 1793, Catalyst was published by Penguin under the Viking imprint.[8]Catalyst takes place in the same high school as Speak and features cameo appearances by some of its characters. Catalyst became a Barnes & Noble Best Teen Book of 2002, an American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults, and was nominated for many state awards.[9] In 2005, Anderson published Prom, which appeared on The New York Times best seller list during early 2005.[6]Prom received three starred reviews, was nominated for several state awards, and received national recognition from the American Library Association and the International Reading Association.[10] Anderson's fourth YA novel, Twisted, was released in the spring of 2007 by Viking. It has awards, such as the ALA Best Book for Young Adults 2008, ALA Quick Pick for Young Adults 2008, International Reading Association Top Ten of 2007, and New York Public Library Best Books for the Teen Age, and became a The New York Times best seller.[11] Anderson's most recent young adult novel, Wintergirls, was released in March 2009. The novel tells the story of two girls, one of whom is dead at the beginning, suffering from (bulimia and anorexia). Wintergirls received five-star reviews and many nominations for state awards, was named an ALA Quick Pick for Young Adults, was a Junior Library Guild Selection,[12] and debuted on The New York Times Best Seller list.[13]Wintergirls has been published in over 15 different countries. The following year, Anderson's Fever, 1793, a historical fiction novel set in Philadelphia during the Yellow Fever epidemic, was published by Simon and Schuster. Fever, 1793 received two starred reviews, many state and national awards, and was a Publishers Weekly Bestseller.[14] In May 2004, the Gifford Family Theatre, in Syracuse, New York, premiered a stage play adapted from the novel.[15] Anderson's historical fiction picture book, Thank You, Sarah! The Woman Who Saved Thanksgiving was also published in 2002. Thank You, Sarah received two starred reviews, several state award nominations, and was named in the ALA Amelia Bloomer List and the Junior Library Guild Selection.[16] In 2008, Anderson published another historical fiction novel, entitled Chains, a narrative about a teenage Revolutionary War-era slave. The novel, the first in a trilogy dubbed Seeds of America, was awarded the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction.[17] The second novel in the Seeds of America trilogy, Forge, was released in October, 2010, by Simon and Schuster. In the short time since its release, Forge has received three-starred reviews and has become a Junior Library Guild Selection, a Kirkus Best Book for Teens: Historical Novels 2010, The Horn Book Fanfare List Best Book of 2010 and a YALSA 2011 Best Books for Young Adults.[18] In a culture where Anderson believes teenagers and young adults are poorly depicted she states that, “I have a lot of material to work with.”[2] Anderson’s lack of fear in tackling tough issues specifically surrounding young adults is what provides the credibility in many young adults confiding their story in her. When choosing to write a historical novel, Anderson states that she must be “overwhelmingly curious about a time period or situation, or she will not touch it. I need to be on fire about something,” states Anderson, “in order to commit to research and the challenge of writing.”[2] Anderson finds inspiration in short conversations overheard while running errands, ideas through what she is reading, and the events she witnesses surrounding her life. With a plethora of ideas, Anderson must limit herself to the ideas which she feels can be nurtured and are worth investing time into. Surprisingly, Anderson looks more to the community and the outside world for inspiration in bringing her character, themes, and motifs to life. After looking externally, Anderson then internally crafts the rest of the pieces to her novel. Laurie uses her own lens of life experience and feelings to depict the emotions her characters experience. “As a person, as a Mother, as a girlfriend, she gathers her life experiences that transfer to her storytelling in nonliteral, more emotional ways. As she explains, “I know what it feels like to fall in love, fall out of love, be starry- eyed, have a jealous fit. Whatever the emotional tenor of the scene requires, I have been there. So even if I make up every single detail of the scene, the emotions probably echo something I have lived through.”[2] Laurie Halse Anderson has been nominated and won multiple honorary awards over her literary work. Among her earlier work Anderson was honored for her children’s picture books which received numerous awards and were placed on the recommended reading lists. For the masterpiece Speak, Anderson won the Printz Honor Book Award, a National Book Award nomination, Golden Kite award, the Edgar Allan Poe Award, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Along with Speak her awards have also encompassed the book Fever 1793, which she won the American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults selection and the Junior Library Guild selection. In 2008, Chains was selected for the National Book Award Finalist and in 2009 was awarded for its Historical Fiction the Scott O’Dell Award.[19]

Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

Sarah Mussi

Sarah Mussi started out with every intention of following a carer as an artist; that did not turn out to be what happened, and now she is now an award-winning and critically acclaimed YA author - as well as being a teacher. Here she talks to Graham Marks about her fascinating and well-travelled life, and the story behind her latest novel, Siege…

Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

James Campbell

James Campbell is a playwright, a comedian, a storyteller and he does comedy workshops. He has been described as ‘the only stand-up comedian for children in the known universe’. Last but not least, he’s also an author, of books. Here he talks to Graham Marks about his latest book Boyface and the Tartan Badger.