Related to: 'Kanwaljit Kaur-Singh'

Franklin Watts

Sikh Gurdwara

Kanwaljit Kaur-Singh, Emma Trithart
Contributors:
Kanwaljit Kaur-Singh, Emma Trithart

What is a gurdwara for? Who is Guru Nanak? What is the Guru Granth Sahib? How do Sikhs worship? All these questions and more are explored in this first introduction to the religion of Sikhism.The We Worship Here series introduces children aged 6+ to the main religions of the world. Each book features information about beliefs, values and the ways people worship. The books are clearly and sensitively written and the text is supported with beautiful illustrations.

Wayland

Vote for Me!

Louise Spilsbury, Mike Gordon
Contributors:
Louise Spilsbury, Mike Gordon

From ancient Greek philosophy to modern governments, find out how different systems and beliefs have developed across the globe.Introduce children to the concept of politics and find out who's in charge across the world from presidents, prime ministers and dictators, to kings and queens.This book will look at different systems of leadership that exist globally, looking in particular at how democracies work and what voting and elections are.It looks at the seven main types of governments/ways of ruling - Anarchy; Dictatorship; Monarchy; Theocracy; Totalitarian; Republic; Democracy. It looks at the set-up of democratic governments, in particular the UK and US and what they do, for example making laws, funding armies, providing services and how they make these things happen and why we pay taxes.We talk about the different political ideologies that different governments have, such as capitalism and communism, and the spectrum of ideologies from the far left to the far right, including liberalism, socialism, conservatism and fascism - and in between. How do elections work? What types of elections are there, for example, local, state, for a leader, or national/general, how candidates are chosen, what voting systems are in place, such as PPR and FPP, who is entitled to vote and how votes are cast and counted. Finally, find out what it takes to become a leader and get people to vote for you. Learn how to get involved by joining school councils or running school elections.For children aged 9+ and a useful resource for children studying PSHE and Citizenship.

Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

A Soldier, A Dog and A Boy

Libby Hathorn, Phil Lesnie
Contributors:
Libby Hathorn, Phil Lesnie
Orion Children's Books

The Story of Ireland

Stewart Ross, Richard Brassey
Contributors:
Stewart Ross, Richard Brassey

Comic, colourful and succinct, with short text, lots of pictures and jokey captions, this is a brilliant introduction to the story of Ireland. From its pictorial endpaper maps to the panels of 'Irish Icons' ranging from Brian Boru to the Abbey Theatre, it is packed with useful and fascinating information. A story that is often complicated and turbulent is told with sensitivity and clarity, from the first legends right up to the present day. The Story of Ireland is the follow-up to Richard Brassey and Stewart Ross's The Story of Scotland, which won the Saltire Society/TES Award for Educational Publications and the Scottish Arts Council Children's Book Award.

Wayland

Birth

Ronne Randall
Authors:
Ronne Randall
Franklin Watts

We are Sikhs

Philip Blake
Authors:
Philip Blake
Wayland

Running Out Of Energy

Ewan Mcleish
Authors:
Ewan Mcleish

How people use the Earth`s natural resources affects the environment and our dependency on it. This series looks at the key issues that affect the environment, both on a local and global scale and aims to find sustainable solutions to the current problems. With fact boxes, evidence boxes and case studies to substantiate the text, this is a complete resource for any classroom..

Hodder Children's Books

Jupiter Williams

S I Martin
Authors:
S I Martin
Wayland

Sikhism

Honor Head
Authors:
Honor Head

This title looks at the gurdwara and what it means to those who follow the Sikh religion. The religious services that people participate in, signs and symbols important to Sikhs, festivals and holy places are also looked at in detail.

Wayland

Divali

Saviour Pirotta
Authors:
Saviour Pirotta

An ideal introduction to the celebration of Diwali for children aged 4-7 in Foundation Stage and KS1 classes. This book describes the story behind the Diwali festivities and how Hindus, Sikhs and Jains prepare for Diwali. It shows how people around the world decorate their homes with lights and rangoli patterns, and how they end the Diwali celebration with a special day for brothers and sisters. Attractively designed, its simple text and wonderful full-colour photos make this an essential resource in every Early Years setting. 'Did You Know?' boxes highlight interesting and unusual facts about Divali to give further points for children and adults to discuss. And a Hindu calendar shows when the different months are.

Hodder Children's Books

Jupiter Amidships

S I Martin
Authors:
S I Martin

Jupiter and his brother Patrick are about to embark on a merchant ship bound for home in Sierra Leone, but are set upon by a vicious Navy pressgang. The brothers are beaten, bound, imprisoned at bayonet point, and finally marched to join a Royal Navy Frigate, the Boneta. In word and deed, they are now prisoners of his Majesty King George. They have no idea where they are, or where they are heading. The Boneta is a ship full of secrets, and it's on a mission. Enemies are swiftly made, and the brothers can trust no one. Amid the mystery and danger, Jupiter will need all his strength and wits to survive - and, most surprising of all, some very strange and new technology. What they discover hidden in the holds of the ship, will propel Jupiter and Patrick into an entirely unforeseen battle for their lives ...

Wayland

Death

Sarah Levete
Authors:
Sarah Levete
Hodder Children's Books

Tiger

Geoffrey Malone
Authors:
Geoffrey Malone

In the Indian forest, danger lurks in every corner and Kuma must teach her cubs the harsh rules of survival against Nature. But when a tiger is worth more dead than alive, she must face the most cunning enemy of all - Humans. From eyes to bones, a tiger's body is worth its weight in gold and when poachers infiltrate the Kanla Tiger Park, a more desperate struggle begins. The tigers' fate lies with Himal and Anji and their father Inspector Singh, who together with the Park's trained elephants and riders, must save the tigers by setting their own trap ...

Wikipedia

Saviour Pirotta

Saviour Pirotta (born 1958, Naxxar, Malta) is a children's book author based in England.[1] The second of five brothers, he grew up speaking both English and Maltese. He attended Naxxar Primary School and later won a scholarship to St Aloysius' College (Malta), one of the most prestigious schools on the island. He developed a love of literature early on in life when he discovered the works of Maltese folklorist Manuel Magri, the legends of Father Peter Delia, the works of C.S. Lewis and a children's adventure story by local author Guze Galea called Ragel Bil-Ghaqal (A Serious Man). His first short novel, The Pirates of Pudding Beach, paid tribute to it. The author's parents, both extremely devout Catholics, discouraged his interest in the arts and censored most television programmes. The family did watch Italian television series, however, and the RAI adaptations of Emilio Salgari's novels about the Asian pirate Sandokan made a big impression on the young Pirotta, as did frequent reruns of neorealist classics, in particular Vittorio De Sica's Shoeshine and Miracle in Milan. Pirotta also cites as visual influences the works of legendary film animator Ray Harryhausen and Alexander Korda, who produced the 1940 fantasy film The Thief of Baghdad, starring the South Asian actor Sabu. Rare visits to the cinema to watch Biblical epics like Ben Hur and The Ten Commandments were also to prove of lasting influence, which later led to an interest in the sword and sandal genre of movies and historical novels, especially the works of Rosemary Sutcliff. Having finished his secondary education at St. Aloysius, Pirotta enrolled in a hotel management course, but left during the second year, mainly due to bullying from fellow students, although during an interview with a local newspaper two years later he claimed that 'in a world where people are still dying of hunger and fighting for basic human rights, I don't want to waste my life deciding which wine goes with which fish.' He had a variety of jobs while attending a two year evening course at the Manoel Theatre Academy of Dramatic Arts, Malta's national drama school. While in his second year, he wrote a children's radio play which he sold to a local station for £5. After graduating, he directed various plays at the Manoel Theatre and helped set up Malta's first youth theatre company, for which he adapted and produced several works. By now he had decided that his future lay in writing and in October 1981, he moved to the UK. His first job was directing three short plays for Moonshine Community Arts Workshop in London, an off-shoot of Brian Way's pioneering Theatre Centre. He also wrote a children's play based on a Maltese folk tale which toured various venues around London, including the Oval House and Jacksons Lane Community Centre.[2] This brought him to the attention of the Commonwealth Institute, where he worked as a workshop leader and storyteller till 1989 alongside other artists from the Commonwealth including the Guyanese poet John Agard. The children's play was subsequently published by Samuel French and Pirotta has since concentrated on writing. His first efforts were picture books but he soon moved into non-fiction, specialising in pirates and religious festivals. His Pirates and Treasure, published in the UK, the US, Russia and Sweden in 1995 is widely considered to be the first children's book about sea-robbers with a multi-cultural viewpoint. For a while he also wrote science books for the very young using the pen name Sam Godwin. A Seed In Need - a first look at life cycle of a flower - won him the 1998 English Association Award for best non-fiction picture book. After the success of his next two books, Turtle Bay and The Orchard Book of First Greek Myths, Pirotta decided to write solely under his own name. Turtle Bay, published by Frances Lincoln in the UK and Farrar, Strauss, Giroux in the United States was selected by members of a book review panel appointed by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and assembled in cooperation with The Children's Book Council (CBC) as a Notable Science Trade Book of 1998. He has since concentrated on retelling folktales, producing The Sleeping Princess with illustrator Emma Chichester Clarke in 2002; The Orchard Book Of First Greek Myths with Jan Lewis in 2003 (both books for Orchard Books, an imprint of Hachette Livre); Aesop's Fables [2006];Around the World in 80 Tales [2007], both illustrated by Richard Johnson and published by Kingfisher in the UK and the US. In 2008 he performed at the Edinburgh International Book Festival for the first time where his show was sold out. He writes in English and his books are produced mainly for the English-speaking market but they have been successfully published by major companies in various countries, including the United States, Italy, France, Spain, Holland, Portugal, Rumania, Belgium, Sweden, Brazil, Thailand, Greece, Estonia, Poland, Russia and Korea. The author is now a British citizen and lives in Saltaire, Yorkshire. He is very much committed to empowering children to write and still performs workshops and story-making sessions in schools around the UK. He is a member of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, the SCBWI and the Scattered Authors' Society. In November 2010, Firebird was awarded an Aesop Accolade by the American Folklore Society. It shared the honour with Eric A. Kimmel's Joha Makes a Wish: A Middle Eastern Tale and Cloud Tea Monkeys by Mal Peet and Elspeth Graham. ANTHOLOGIES Storyworld [illustrated by Fiona Small], Blackie & Sons, 1988 [re-issued as Tales From Around the World in 1994] Joy To The World - Christmas Stories from Around the Globe[illustrated by Sheila Moxley], Frances Lincoln/Harpercollins, 1998 The Sleeping Princess and other Fairy Tales from Grimm [illustrated by Emma Chichester Clark], Orchard Books 2002 [titled The MacElderry Book of Grimm's Fairy Tales in the US] The Orchard Book Of First Greek Myths [illustrated by Jan Lewis], Orchard Books, 2003 Once Upon A World[illustrated by Alan Marks], Watts/Sea to Sea Publications, 2004 Aesop's Fables [illustrated by Richard Johnson], Kingfisher 2005 Around The World in 80 Tales [illustrated by Richard Johnson], Kingfisher 2007 Children's Stories from the Bible (illustrated by Ian Andrew and Anne Yvonne Gilbert), Templar 2008 The Giant Book of Giants, Egmont Books, October 2011 PICTURE BOOKS Solomon's Secret [illustrated by Helen Cooper], Methuen/Dial 1989 Little Bird [illustrated by Steve Butler], Frances Lincoln/Tambourine 1992 Turtle Bay [illustrated by Nilesh Mistry], Frances Lincoln/Farrar Straus Giroux, 1998 [reissed as Turtle Watch, 2008] Patrick Paints A Picture [Illustrated by Linz West], Frances Lincoln 2008 Firebird [illustrated by Catherine Hyde], Templar Sept 2010 FORTHCOMING BOOKS The Orchard Book of Ballet Stories for the Very Young, Orchard Books, 2013 Grimm's Fairy Tales, a six-books series from Orchard Books, January 2012 October to March 2012

Joyce Bentley

Joyce Bentley was a publisher of children's non-fiction for more than 10 years having also commissioned and edited over 1,000 books. As a writer she specialises in books for young children on science and religion. Based in Twickenham, she divides her time between writing and commissioning for children's non-fiction - a job she absolutely loves

Hayley Welsh

Hayley has been drawing for as long as she can remember and always enjoyed writing stories and making books when she was a child.Throughout her childhood, she practiced her drawing and finally decided to study Illustration at Blackpool College of Art and Design.Hayley graduated in 2007, and since then has worked as an editorial illustrator for 'The Independent on Sunday' and worked as a freelance illustrator in the UK and Australia.She also works alongside local councils and schools, taking part in illustration workshops and holding various exhibtions throughout the year.'This Way Up' is Hayley's first children's book by Hodders Childrens Books, which she hopes to be the first of many.www.hayleywelsh.com

Updated June 2017

Our Ethical and Environmental Policy

Our ethical and environmental policy

Wikipedia

Shaun Tan

Shaun Tan (born 1974) is an Australian illustrator and author of children's books and speculative fiction cover artist. He won an Academy Award for the The Lost Thing, a 2011 animated film adaptation of a 2000 picture book he wrote and illustrated. Beside The Lost Thing, The Red Tree and The Arrival are chapterbooks he has written and illustrated. Tan was born in Fremantle, Western Australia in 1974 and, after freelancing for some years from a studio at Mount Lawley, relocated to Melbourne, Victoria in 2007.[1] In 2006, his wordless graphic novelThe Arrival won the "Book of the Year" prize as part of the New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards.[2] The same book won the Children's Book Council of Australia "Picture Book of the Year" award in 2007.[3] and the Western Australian Premier's Book Awards Premier's Prize in 2006.[4] Tan was the University of Melbourne's Department of Language Literacy and Arts Education Illustrator In Residence for two weeks through an annual Fellowship offered by the May Gibbs Children’s Literature Trust.[5] In 2010, Shaun Tan was the Artist Guest of Honour at the 68th World Science Fiction Convention held in Melbourne, Australia. For his career contribution to "children's and young adult literature in the broadest sense" Tan won the 2011 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award from the Swedish Arts Council, the biggest prize in children's literature.[6] As a boy, Tan spent time illustrating poems and stories and drawing dinosaurs, robots and spaceships. At school he was known as a talented artist.[1] At the age of eleven, he became a fan of The Twilight Zone television series as well as books that bore similar themes. Tan cites Ray Bradbury as a favorite at this time. These stories led to Tan writing his own short stories. Of his effort at writing as a youth, Tan tells, "I have a small pile of rejection letters as testament to this ambition!"[7] Eventually he gained success with his illustrations. At the age of sixteen, Tan's first illustration appeared in the Australian magazine Aurealis in 1990.[7] Tan almost studied to become a geneticist, and enjoyed chemistry, physics, history and English when in high school as well as art and claimed that he did not really know what he wanted to do, even at university.[7] University studies were taking him along an academic route until he "decided to stop studying and try working as an artist."[8] Illustration was something Tan enjoyed. The decision to choose it as a career simply allowed him to make a living from drawing and painting.[8] Drawing was something he had never stopped doing, claiming "...it was one thing I could do better than anyone else when I was in school."[7] Tan claims that he had little formal training in the field of book illustration.[1] Tan attended Balcatta Senior High School in the northern suburbs of Perth where he was enrolled in a special art program for gifted and talented students. "The main advantage," cites Tan, "was that students came to be taught by a wide range of practising artists, not just art teachers."[8] He completed the program in 1991 and he "credits the...Program [for] providing him the fundamental skills of art making." [9] Tan continued his education at the University of Western Australia where he studied Fine Arts, English Literature and History. While this was of interest to him, there was little studio practice involved.[8] In 1995, he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts.[10] Of his actual works he has said: ‘‘I don’t think I’ve ever painted an image as a reproduction of what I’m seeing, even when I’m working in front of it. I’m always trying to create some kind of parallel equivalent."[7] Originally, Tan worked in black and white because the final reproductions would be printed that way and this preference extended to The Stray Cat. Some black and white mediums he used included pens, inks, acrylics, charcoal, scraperboard, photocopies and linocuts.[7] Tan's current colour works still begin as monochromatic. He uses a graphite pencil to make sketches on ordinary copy paper. The sketches are then reproduced numerous times with different versions varying with parts added or removed. Sometimes scissors are used for this purpose. The cut and paste collage idea in these early stages often extend to the finished production with many of his illustrations using such materials as "glass, metal, cuttings from other books and dead insects."[7] Tan describes himself as a slow worker who revises his work many times along the way. He is interested in loss and alienation, and believes that children in particular react well to issues of natural justice. He feels he is "like a translator" of ideas, and is happy and flattered to see his work adapted and interpreted in film and music (such as by the Australian Chamber Orchestra).[11] Tan draws from a large source of inspiration and cites many influences on his work. His comment on the subject is: "I’m pretty omnivorous when it comes to influences, and I like to admit this openly."[7] Some influences are very direct. The Lost Thing is a strong example where Tan makes visual references to famous artworks. Many of his influences are a lot more subtle visually, some of the influences are ideological. Below are some influences he has named in various interviews: The Shaun Tan Award for Young Artists is sponsored by the City of Subiaco and open to all Perth school children between 5 and 17 years. The award is aimed at encouraging creativity in two-dimensional works. It is held annually with award winners announced in May and finalists' works exhibited at the Subiaco Library (crn Rokeby and Bagot Road, Subiaco) throughout June.[13] Mural in the Children's Section of the Subiaco Public Library (Perth, Western Australia). Size: 20 square metres[1]

Ewan Mcleish

Ewan Mcleish is a writer and lecturer on science and environmental issues, and former Director of the Council for Environmental Education. He has recentlry worked with teachers in the Cameroon, West Africa, developing education materials about the environment, including rainforests. He writes on a wide range of topics including science, geography and the environment.

Akala

BAFTA and MOBO award-winning hip hop artist, writer, poet and historian Akala is a label owner and social entrepreneur who fuses unique rap/rock/electro-punk sound with fierce storytelling. Jay-Z, M.I.A. and Christina Aguilera are just a few of the musicians Akala's toured with, his own stellar live show headlined eight UK tours and he regularly appears at festivals such as Glastonbury and Wireless.More recently known for his compelling lectures and journalism, Akala has written for the The Guardian, Huffington Post UK and The Independent, and also taken part in British Council arts education and music projects all over the world.In 2009, with Sir Ian McKellen's support, Akala launched the 'The Hip-hop Shakespeare Company', a music theatre production company which sparked worldwide media interest. Previous clients and collaborators include the BBC, Premier League, Mastercard, The Barbican and Ed Sheeran.Akala has also featured on numerous TV programmes across Channel 4, ITV2, MTV, Sky Arts and the BBC promoting his projects as well as speaking on wide ranging subjects from music and poetry to youth engagement and British/African-Caribbean culture.