Related to: 'Tony Bradman'

Franklin Watts

The Toxic Cookie Monster

Tony Bradman, Wil Overton
Contributors:
Tony Bradman, Wil Overton

Kid Force 3 are Jayden, Layla and Caleb. They aren't regular kids, they're super kids - each with an amazing superhero power.In Toxic Cookie Monster a bad bag of cookies turns a teacher into a monster, and Kid Force 3 have to save the town from her chocolate chip craving.This title is published by Franklin Watts EDGE, which produces a range of books to encourage children's reading development. This series is suitable for guided reading with children aged 5+, and contains accessible storylines in a familiar setting with science fiction themes. It can also be used with older, independent readers who have low reading confidence or who are struggling to enjoy books.

Franklin Watts

Dr Vlogger

Tony Bradman, Wil Overton
Contributors:
Tony Bradman, Wil Overton
Orchard Books

The Greatest Stories Ever Told

Tony Bradman, Tony Ross
Contributors:
Tony Bradman, Tony Ross

This spellbinding collection brings together nine classic adventure stories, each one as thrilling as the last.Travel to far-off lands with fantastical beasts and powerful sorcerers, do battle with dastardly villains and uncover ancient treasure guarded by a fire-breathing dragon. From the heroics of Jason and Hercules, to the bravery of Robin Hood and the cunning of Ali Baba, this is a book full of excitement, surprise and adventure.Told by renowned storyteller Tony Bradman in a lively, humorous style and fully illustrated throughout by the incomparable Tony Ross, this beautiful hardback book, complete with a foiled jacket, will make the perfect gift.Stories included are:Jason and the Golden FleeceKing Arthur's BeginningsAladdin Hercules and the Monstrous CacusSinbad the SailorGeorge and the DragonAli Baba and the Forty ThievesTheseus and the MinotaurRobin Hood

Wayland

The Baker's Boy and the Great Fire of London

Tom Bradman, Tony Bradman, Andy Catling
Contributors:
Tom Bradman, Tony Bradman, Andy Catling

This exciting story brings the tale of the great fire of London to life for young readers. When Will Farriner wakes to the sound of crackling flames and the smell of smoke, he knows something is terribly wrong! As his family escape the flames engulfing their bakery, Will realises he must stop the fire from spreading. But what can be done before all of London goes up in smoke?Full of adventure and danger, this short text is suitable for struggling readers but engaging enough to give confident readers a quick, fun read.Suitable for use in schools as guided reading texts or for reading independently.

Orchard Books

My Unwilling Witch Starts a Fun Park

Hiawyn Oram, Sarah Warburton
Contributors:
Hiawyn Oram, Sarah Warburton

Can you believe THIS? Haggy Aggy's only been witchnapped and put to work spelling a broken-down Amusement Park into the Scariest Fun Park Ever. All I can say is SOCKS, TADPOLES IN SOCKS and HELP!

Wayland

Poison!

Andrew Fusek Peters
Authors:
Andrew Fusek Peters

A short thriller that's high on suspense! This is a perfect page turner if you want to finish a story in one sitting, especially for reluctant and struggling readers. Cool, edgy computer hackers, Kiran and Ros are teens on a mission to fight crime and injustice with the help of a shape-shifting data beast they've created.In Poison!, Kiran and Roz set out to prove that a chemical company is polluting the river near their school and the poisoning the fish that live in it. With the help of the data beast they attempt to bring the murky activities into the light - and the beast goes on a dangerous mission to save the threatened fish.Reading level for this book:-ATOS: 2.6Lexile ® Measure: 360LBook Band: 11 Lime

Wayland

Monster Savings

Andrew Fusek Peters
Authors:
Andrew Fusek Peters
Franklin Watts

Duel In The Sky

Tony Bradman
Authors:
Tony Bradman

A new German fighter ace is terrorising British planes over the trenches of France. It will take the bravery and sacrifice of a Britsh ace and the courage of a hero to bring him down.This title is published by Franklin Watts EDGE, which produces a range of books to get children reading with confidence. EDGE - for books kids can't put down.

Franklin Watts

Through Mud and Blood

Tony Bradman
Authors:
Tony Bradman

It is 1918. A British soldier, Bill Sparkes, is carrying an important message for American troops on the frontline. Sparkes is soon caught up in the fighting when the Americans are attacked. With bullets flying all around, Sparkes must find a way to support the Americans and stop the Germans breaking through... This title is published by Franklin Watts EDGE, which produces a range of books to get children reading with confidence. EDGE - for books kids can't put down.

Orchard Books

Stories of World War One

Tony Bradman
Authors:
Tony Bradman

Tales to remember yesterday's fallen - from today's bestselling authors.Compiled by Tony Bradman, this collection of short stories chronicles the events of World War One - imagining the conflicts and emotions of those people caught up in the war and its aftermath. With stories from Malorie Blackman, Geraldine McCaughrean and Oisin McGann, among others, this anthology will be treasured for generations.

Hodder Children's Books

When the Alligator Came to Play

Mara Bergman, Nick Maland
Contributors:
Mara Bergman, Nick Maland

When an alligator and her baby came creeping, creeping into the playground, were the people scared? You bet they were! But as three brave children soon discover, the alligators aren't there to eat them after all!A joy to read aloud with outstanding illustrations, this follow-up to the award-winning Snip Snap! (now reissued as Here Comes the Alligator!) will be relished by children and adults alike.'The original story is a sure fire hit as a read aloud and fans will definitely want to try this sequel.' The Bookbag

Orchard Books

The Orchard Book of Swords Sorcerers and Superheroes

Tony Bradman, Tony Ross
Contributors:
Tony Bradman, Tony Ross

This collection brings together ten classic stories, each one as thrilling as the last. From the heroics of Jason and the Argonauts, to the courage of George as he sets out to fight the terrible dragon, to the bravery and kindness of Robin Hood, this is a book full of excitement, surprises and adventure. Retold in a lively and humorous style by Tony Bradman and accompanied by Tony Ross's distinctive illustrations, these stories will capture every child's imagination from the very first page. Contents: Jason and the Golden Fleece * King Arthur's Beginnings * Aladdin and His Magic Lamp * William Tell * Hercules and the Monstrous Cacus * Sinbad the Sailor and the Roc * George and the Dragon * Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves * Theseus and the Minotaur * Robin Hood and the Sheriff

Hodder Children's Books

Yum Yum

Mara Bergman, Nick Maland
Contributors:
Mara Bergman, Nick Maland
Hodder Children's Books

Oliver Who Would Not Sleep

Mara Bergman, Nick Maland
Contributors:
Mara Bergman, Nick Maland

Oliver Donnington Rimington Sneep couldn't and didn't and would not sleep. It's not that he is afraid of the dark, or monsters, or robbers or sounds from the park. But Oliver Donnington Rimington Sneep likes staying awake more than going to sleep. Join Oliver on his journey to Mars and back before he finally, finally, finally goes to sleep. Superb bedtime tale, told in rhyme and great to read aloud, with stunning illustrations from award-winner Nick Maland.

Hodder Children's Books

Snip Snap

Mara Bergman, Nick Maland
Contributors:
Mara Bergman, Nick Maland

Reminiscent of We're Going on a Bear Hunt, this text is an absolute delight to read aloud, enabling a child audience to really join in. An alligator is creeping up the stairs, slithering down the hall and swishing and swooshing its tremendous tail and the children are very scared. Until they decide they've had enough of all this scary alligator stuff! And they banish him back from where he came. Beautifully designed and illustrated this book is a real treat!

Hodder Children's Books

The Poetry Store

A one-stop collection of poems on a wide variety of themes to appeal to children aged 8-12 and a staple resource of topic-based poems for KS2 teachers. By the compiler of the best-selling THE WORKS (100,000 + copies since publication in August 2000), this book complements THE WORKS and THE WORKS 2 which are organised by form and curriculum subject respectively. But it also has direct appeal to children and families too by virtue of being subject focussed.Contains approximately 40 headings of 8-10 poems each making about 350 poems grouped in categories such as:School, home, brothers and sisters, parents, teachers, friends, hobbies, football, feeling happy, feeling sad, animals, nature, space, love, feeling angry, feeling afraid, our bodies, senses, festivals, seasons, food, weather, holidays, pets, sport, computers, television, toys, transport, magic ...In addition to the usual indexes of first lines and authors, an index of forms will enable teachers to locate haikus, sonnets, kennings, riddles, acrostics etc for Literacy Hour purposes.

27 Oct
Imperial War Museum London, Lambeth Road, London SE1 6HZ

Tony Bradman, Sarah Ridley, and Bernard Ashley at the Imperial War Museum

12pm - 1pm

Join three fascinating writers to learn more about the First World War in children's literature.

Wikipedia

Enid Blyton

Enid Mary Blyton (11 August 1897 – 28 November 1968) was a Britishchildren's writer also known as Mary Pollock. She is noted for numerous series of books based on recurring characters and designed for different age groups. Her books have enjoyed huge success in many parts of the world, and have sold over 600 million copies.[1] One of Blyton's most widely known characters is Noddy, intended for early years readers. However, her main work is the genre of young readers' novels in which children have their own adventures with minimal adult help. Series of this type include the Famous Five (21 novels, 1942–1963, based on four children and their dog), the Five Find-Outers and Dog, (15 novels, 1943–1961, where five children regularly outwit the local police) as well as The Secret Seven (15 novels, 1949–1963, a society of seven children who solve various mysteries). Her work involves children's adventure stories, and fantasy, sometimes involving magic. Her books were and still are enormously popular throughout the Commonwealth and across most of the globe. Her work has been translated into nearly 90 languages. Blyton's literary output was of an estimated 800 books over roughly 40 years. Chorion Limited of London now owns and handles the intellectual properties and character brands of Blyton's Noddy and the well known series the Famous Five. Blyton was born on 11 August 1897 at 354 Lordship Lane, East Dulwich, London, England, the eldest child of Thomas Carey Blyton (1870–1920), a salesman of cutlery, and his wife, Theresa Mary Harrison Blyton (1874–1950). There were two younger brothers, Hanly (1899–1983) and Carey (1902–1976), who were born after the family had moved to the nearby suburb of Beckenham—in Oakwood Avenue. Blyton adored her father and was devastated after he left the family to live with another woman; this has often been cited as the reason behind her emotional immaturity. Blyton and her mother did not have a good relationship, and later in life, Blyton claimed to others that her mother was dead. After both her parents did die, Blyton attended neither of their funerals. From 1907 to 1915, Blyton was educated at St. Christopher's School in Beckenham, leaving as head girl. She enjoyed physical activities along with some academic work, but not maths. Blyton was a talented pianist, but gave up her musical studies when she trained as a teacher at Ipswich High School.[2] She taught for five years at Bickley, Surbiton and Chessington, writing in her spare time. Her first book, Child Whispers, a collection of poems, was published in 1922. On 28 August 1924 Blyton married Major Hugh Alexander Pollock, DSO (1888–1971), editor of the book department in the publishing firm of George Newnes, which published two of her books that year. The couple moved to Bourne End, Buckinghamshire (Peterswood in her books).[3] Eventually they moved to a house in Beaconsfield, named Green Hedges by Blyton's readers following a competition in Sunny Stories. They had two children: Gillian Mary Baverstock (15 July 1931 – 24 June 2007) and Imogen Mary Smallwood (born 27 October 1935). In the mid-1930s Blyton experienced a spiritual crisis, but she decided against converting to Roman Catholicism from the Church of England because she had felt it was "too restricting". Although she rarely attended church services, she saw that her two daughters were baptised into the Anglican faith and went to the local Sunday School. Since her death in 1968 and the publication of her daughter Imogen's autobiography, A Childhood at Green Hedges, Blyton has emerged as an emotionally immature, unstable and often malicious figure. By 1939 her marriage to Pollock was in difficulties, and she began a series of affairs. In 1941 she met Kenneth Fraser Darrell Waters, a London surgeon with whom she began a relationship. During her divorce, Blyton blackmailed Pollock into taking full blame for the failure of the marriage, knowing that exposure of her adultery would ruin her public image. She promised that if he admitted to charges of infidelity, she would allow him unlimited access to their daughters. However, after the divorce, Pollock was forbidden to contact his daughters, and Blyton ensured he was unable to find work in publishing afterwards. He turned to drinking heavily and was forced to petition for bankruptcy. Blyton and Darrell Waters married at the City of Westminster Register Office on 20 October 1943, and she subsequently changed the surname of her two daughters to Darrell Waters. Pollock remarried thereafter. Blyton's second marriage was very happy and, as far as her public image was concerned, she moved smoothly into her role as a devoted doctor's wife, living with him and her two daughters at Green Hedges. Blyton's husband died in 1967. During the following months, she became increasingly ill. Afflicted by Alzheimer's disease, Blyton was moved into a nursing home three months before her death; she died at the Greenways Nursing Home, London, on 28 November 1968, aged 71 years and was cremated at the Golders Green Crematorium where her ashes remain. Blyton's home, Green Hedges, was sold in 1971 and demolished in 1973. The area where Green Hedges once stood is now occupied by houses and a street called Blyton Close. A blue plaque commemorates Blyton at Hook Road in Chessington, where she lived from 1920-4. [4] Her daughter Imogen has been quoted as saying "The truth is Enid Blyton was arrogant, insecure, pretentious, very skilled at putting difficult or unpleasant things out of her mind, and without a trace of maternal instinct. As a child, I viewed her as a rather strict authority. As an adult I pitied her."[5] Elder daughter, Gillian, did not hold the same view toward their mother, and Imogen's biography of Blyton contains a foreword by Gillian to the effect that her memories of childhood with Enid Blyton were mainly happy ones. The Red Story Book, The Green Story Book, The Blue Story Book, Bedtime Stories are some other books by Enid Blyton. Blyton wrote hundreds of other books for young and older children: novels, story collections and some non-fiction. She also filled a large number of magazine pages, particularly the long-running Sunny Stories which were immensely popular among younger children. She used a pseudonym Mary Pollock for a few titles (middle name plus first married name). The last volumes in her most famous series were published in 1963. Many books still appeared after that, but were mainly story books made up from recycled work. Blyton also wrote numerous books on nature and Biblical themes. Her story The Land of Far-Beyond is a Christian parable along the lines of John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, with modern children as the central characters. She also produced retellings of Old Testament and New Testament stories. Enid Blyton was a prolific author of short stories. These were first published, for the most part, in Sunny Stories, an Enid Blyton magazine, or other children's papers. She also used to explore the forests when she was a little girl and wrote of her dreams in a notebook kept by her bedside. In February 2011, the manuscript of a previously unknown Blyton novel, Mr Tumpy's Caravan, was discovered in a collection of her papers which had been auctioned in 2010[6] following the death of her elder daughter in 2007.[7] Blyton books are generally split into three types. One involves ordinary children in extraordinary situations, having adventures, solving crimes, or otherwise finding themselves in unusual circumstances. Examples include the Famous Five and Secret Seven, and the Adventure series. The second and more conventional type is the boarding school story; the plots of these have more emphasis on the day-to-day life at school. This is the world of the midnight feast, the practical joke, and the social interaction of the various types of character. Examples of this type are the Malory Towers stories, the St Clare's series, and the Naughtiest Girl books and are typical of the times — many comics of the day also contained similar types of story. The third type is the fantastical. Children are typically transported into a magical world in which they meet fairies, goblins, elves, pixies, or other fantasy creatures. Examples of this type are the Wishing-Chair books and The Faraway Tree. In many of her short stories, toys are shown to come alive when humans are not around. Enid Blyton's status as a bestselling author is in spite of disapproval of her works from various perspectives, which has led to altered reprints of the books and withdrawals or “bans” from libraries. In the 1990s, Chorion, the owners of Blyton's works, edited her books to remove passages that were deemed racist or sexist.[8] The children’s author Anne Fine presented an overview of the concerns about Blyton's work and responses to them on BBC Radio 4 in November 2008, in which she noted the “drip, drip, drip of disapproval” associated with the books.[9][10] It was frequently reported (in the 1950s and also from the 1980s onwards) that various children's libraries removed some of Blyton's works from the shelves. The history of such "Blyton bans" is confused. Some librarians certainly at times felt that Blyton's restricted use of language, a conscious product of her teaching background, militated against appreciation of more literary qualities. There was some precedent in the treatment of L. Frank Baum's Oz books (and the many sequels by others) by librarians in the United States in the 1930s. There were numerous critical comments about Blyton: claiming that her vocabulary was too limited, that she presented too rosy a view of the world, even suggestions that little Noddy's relationship with Big Ears was "suspect", that he was a poor role model for boys because he sometimes wept when frustrated and the laws were politically incorrect. A careful account of anti-Blyton attacks is given in Chapter 4 of Robert Druce's This Day Our Daily Fictions. The British Journal of Education in 1955 carried a piece by Janice Dohn, an American children's librarian, considering Blyton's writing together with authors of formula fiction, and making negative comments about Blyton's devices and tone. A 1958 article in Encounter by Colin Welch, directed against the Noddy character, was reprinted in a New Zealand librarians' periodical. This gave rise to the first rumour of a New Zealand "library ban" on Blyton's books, a recurrent press canard. Policy on buying and stocking Blyton's books by British public libraries drew attention in newspaper reports from the early 1960s to the end of the 1970s, as local decisions were made by a London borough, Birmingham, Nottingham and other central libraries. There is no evidence that her books' popularity ever suffered: her response to criticism is said to be that she was not interested in the views of critics aged over 12.[11] Blyton was defended by populist journalists, and others. In November 2009 it was revealed in the British press that the BBC had a longstanding ban on dramatising Blyton's books on the radio from the 1930s to the 1950s. Letters and memos from the BBC Archive show that producers and executives at the time described Blyton as a "tenacious second-rater" who wrote "stilted and longwinded" books which were not suitable to be broadcast. In 1936 Blyton wrote to the BBC suggesting herself as a broadcaster, pointing out that she had "written probably more books than any other writer." She was turned down. In 1938, Blyton's husband, Hugh Pollock, wrote to Sir John Reith, the then Director General of the BBC, pointing out that his wife was receiving letters from children from all parts of the British Empire, and that she should be allowed to speak to them via the radio. Jean E. Sutcliffe, of the BBC's schools broadcast department wrote, "Her stories...haven't much literary value. There is rather a lot of the Pink-winky-Doodle-doodle Dum-dumm type of name (and lots of pixies) in the original tales."[12][13] Enid Blyton tried to get her work on the radio again in 1940, but her manuscript was once more turned down, the BBC employee who reviewed it writing, "This is really not good enough. Very little happens and the dialogue is so stilted and long-winded...It really is odd to think that this woman is a bestseller." Eventually, in 1954, Blyton's works appeared on air for the first time. Jean Sutcliffe wrote of Blyton's ability to churn out "mediocre material", and that "Her capacity to do so, amounts to genius...anyone else would have died of boredom long ago." Michael Rosen, the former Children's Laureate, said of the BBC's ban on Blyton, "...the quality of the writing itself was poor...it was felt that there was a lot of snobbery and racism in the writing...There is all sorts of stuff about oiks and lower orders."[12] The books are very much of their time, particularly the titles published in the 1950s. They present the UK's class system — that is to say, "rough" versus "decent".[14] Many of Blyton's children's books similarly reflected negative stereotypes regarding gender, race, and class. One incidence of altering this type of dated material might be the altering of a statement like "black as a nigger with soot" appearing in Five Go off to Camp.[15][16] At the time, "Negro" was the standard formal term and "nigger" a relatively common colloquialism. This is one of the most obvious targets for alteration in modern reprints, along with the replacement of golliwogs with teddy bears or goblins. Some of this responses by publishers to contemporary attitudes on racial stereotypes has itself drawn criticism from some who view it as tampering with an important piece of the history of children's literature. The Druce book brings up the case of The Little Black Doll (who wanted to be pink), which was turned on its head in a reprint. Also removed in deference to modern ethical attitudes are many casual references to slaves and to corporal punishment - The Faraway Tree's Dame Slap was changed to Dame Snap and several references to characters in the Malory Towers and St. Clare's series being spanked were changed to them being "scolded". Blyton's attitudes came under criticism during her working lifetime; a publisher rejected a story of hers in 1960, taking a negative literary view of it but also saying that "There is a faint but unattractive touch of old-fashioned xenophobia in the author's attitude to the thieves; they are 'foreign'...and this seems to be regarded as sufficient to explain their criminality."[17] Similarly, some have suggested the depictions of boys and girls in her books were sexist. For example, a 2005 Guardian article[18] suggested that the Famous Five depicts a power struggle between Julian, Dick and George (Georgina), with the female characters either acting like boys or being heavily put-upon. Although the gender issues are more subjective than with some of the racial issues, it has been suggested that a new edition of the book will "address" these issues through alterations, which has led to the expression of nostalgia for the books and their lack of political correctness.[19] In the Secret Seven books, the girls are deliberately excluded from tasks such as investigating the villains' hideouts — in Go Ahead, Secret Seven, it is directly stated "'Certainly not,' said Peter, sounding very grown-up all of a sudden. 'This is a man's job, exploring that coal-hole'".[20] In "The Adventurous 4, the two girls are often sent to do the cooking and washing up for the two boys. In the Famous Five this is less often the case, except Anne doing it voluntarily most of the times, but in Five on a Hike Together, Julian gives similar orders to George: "You may look like a boy and behave like a boy, but you're a girl all the same. And like it or not, girls have got to be taken care of."[21]. Similarly, in "Five have a wonderful time", Anne says "I don't expect boys to tidy up and cook and do things like that but George ought to because she's a girl". To this, George replies "If only I'd been born a boy". This is perhaps the most prominent example of gender stereotyping in her books. It shows that the stereotypes were not just enforced by boys but accepted by girls too. The story of Blyton's life was turned into a BBC film in 2009 with Helena Bonham Carter in the title role. Filming began in March 2009 and first aired in the United Kingdom on BBC Four on 16 November 2009, followed by a documentary on Enid Blyton. Matthew Macfadyen and Denis Lawson played Blyton's first husband, Hugh Pollock, and Blyton's second husband, Kenneth Darrell Waters, respectively.[22]

Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

James Campbell

James Campbell is a playwright, a comedian, a storyteller and he does comedy workshops. He has been described as ‘the only stand-up comedian for children in the known universe’. Last but not least, he’s also an author, of books. Here he talks to Graham Marks about his latest book Boyface and the Tartan Badger.

29 May
Starlight Stage, Dairy Meadows, Hay-on-Wye HR3 5PJ

War in Children's Literature at Hay Fever Festival

7pm - 8pm

Come and learn about the First World War at Hay Fever Festival!