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Our books
  • Did Anything Good Come Out of... the Great Depression?

    By Emma Marriott
    Authors:
    Emma Marriott
    Look at the events that lead to the Wall Street Crash of October 1929 and the shockwaves that it sent around the world, leading to economic crisis and financial panic and plunging millions into unemployment, eviction from their homes and grinding poverty. Explore the legacy of the Great Depression internationally, both in terms of the bad things that came out of it, such as political ferment leading to the rise of fascism, and the good things, including the expansion of the welfare state and provision for those in need, technological innovation and the rise of the cinema industry.
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  • Did Anything Good Come Out of... the American Civil War?

    By Philip Steele
    Authors:
    Philip Steele
    This book considers the deadliest war in US history, which killed 750,000 soldiers and many civilians before this young nation was a century old. Its legacy still resonates across the USA today. Did it achieve any of its goals? Did it have unexpected consequences? Did any good at all come out of it?Each book includes a comprehensive overview of the historical event in question, providing background information to help readers understand the issues being discussed. In looking at the consequences of each event, both good and bad, various themes are covered, from politics and society to science, technology and popular culture. The series fits well with the history curriculum at key stage 3, looking at issues in world history and their interconnections with other world developments. Perfect for readers aged 12 and up.
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  • Did Anything Good Come Out of... WWII?

    By Emma Marriott
    Authors:
    Emma Marriott
    This book looks at the events leading to the World War II, the most widespread war in history, in which the major participants used all their industrial, economic and scientific might to wage 'total war'. It examines the legacy of the war, both in terms of the bad things that came out of it, such as the fear and mistrust between the USA and Russia that led to the Cold War, and the good things, including advances in medicine and computing and the establishment of the United Nations.
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  • Did Anything Good Come Out of... the Vietnam War?

    By Philip Steele
    Authors:
    Philip Steele
    This book considers the Vietnam (or Second Indochina) War, 1955-1975, which may have killed as many as 3 million troops and civilians. It divided America, it aroused huge opposition around the world and it divided generations. Why was it fought and what were the outcomes? Did it have any unexpected consequences? Did any good at all come out of it?
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  • Did Anything Good Come Out of... the Cold War?

    By Paul Mason
    Authors:
    Paul Mason
    This book looks at how and why the Cold War developed between the USSR and the USA and their opposing ideas of communism and capitalism. It examines the legacy of the Cold War, both in terms of the bad things that came out of it, such as instability and conflicts around the world, denial of human rights to millions of people and the stockpiling of nuclear and conventional weapons, and the good things, including technological progress, advances in medical understanding and developments in art, literature and sport.
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  • Did Anything Good Come Out of... WWI?

    By Philip Steele
    Authors:
    Philip Steele
    This book looks at how and why World War I was born out of the longstanding rivalries and feuds between European nations, at home and across their overseas empires, and how the conflict sucked in imperial and colonial troops from around the world. It examines the legacy of the the war, both in terms of the bad things that came out of it, such as the rise of fascism and totalitarian rule, and the good things, including developments in medicine and plastic surgery, enhanced aeroplane technology and advances in suffrage and equality for women.
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  • A Day in the Life of a... World War II Evacuee

    By Alan Childs
    Authors:
    Alan Childs
    Spend a day in the country with a young evacuee. Eat a rationed breakfast in a strange home. Try on a gas mask on your first day at the local school. Then watch the Home Guard search through the evening for a missing enemy pilot.By following a day in the life of an evacuee, this book looks at homes and schools, gas masks and shelters, food and rationing, security and entertainment. The wartime countryside is brought to life through beautiful colour artwork and quotes from the age.A combination of fictional narrative and quotes from the age focus on a day in the life of a particular character.
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  • Death in the Arena

    By Caroline Lawrence
    Authors:
    Caroline Lawrence
    Third in a new historical adventure series from million copy selling Caroline Lawrence, set in Roman Britain during the reign of the evil Emperor Domitian.Eleven-year-old Ursula is happily learning to be a Druid in the woods of Britannia. But then she is asked to go on a quest to find a boy who was abducted as a baby. Will her mystical training equip her for life on the road - with a troupe of Roman pantomime dancers and beast hunters? Her task: to adapt to life in the arena Her quest: to find the boy everyone is seekingHer destiny: to protect children and animalsFrom the bestselling author of THE ROMAN MYSTERIES, perfect for children studying at Key Stage 2.
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  • Dictatorship

    By Sean Connolly
    Authors:
    Sean Connolly
    Dictatorship reveals the inner working of this type of government, setting it in the context of history and relating it to today's current affairs. Readers will learn how a dictatorship functions internally and within the wider world community. They will also encounter some of the dilemmas, contradictions and compromises that seem to be an essential part of even the most idealistic political systems. Part of the Systems of Government series, these books feature fact boxes, timelines and carefully chosen images that complement informative text that is packed with case studies and first-hand accounts. Voting Booth panels invite readers to consider thorny issues, both historical and current, and to form their own opinions. Perfect for readers aged 12 and up.
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  • Democracy

    By Sean Connolly
    Authors:
    Sean Connolly
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  • Dastardly Dictators, Rulers & other Loony Leaders

    By Paul Harrison
    Authors:
    Paul Harrison
    Discover all about the fascinating lives of some of the most unusual, quirky and eccentric characters in world history! Learn about the Persian King who ordered the sea to be whipped as punishment, find out why a thirteenth-century crusader took to the streets in his pants, and what posessed a French Queen to build a fake tumble-down village for £4 million. Peppered with Crackpot Quiz questions and Mad, Bad and Truly Sticky Endings features this book is enthralling, entertaining and educational all at the same time!
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  • Dead Heat

    By Shoo Rayner
    Authors:
    Shoo Rayner
    It's a boiling hot summer in Fort Finis Terrae! The locals are getting restless, and demand a sacrifice to try and end the drought. Will Brit and Festus be forced to give up their new best friend Romeo the hare?
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  • The Digital Age: 1947–Present Day

    By Charlie Samuels
    Authors:
    Charlie Samuels
    A must for Key Stage 3 students aged 11 and up, this engaging book uses timelines to describe scientific and technological advances from 1947 to the present day. The Digital Age investigates recent scientific developments, including major scientific advancements of the understanding of human genetics and the invention of the Internet. Each volume in the five-book series examines the story of scientific discovery in a series of timelines and each chapter examines either a particular aspect of science, or the life and work of an important scientist of the time. Parallels with other fields, such as astronomy and mathematics are highlighted so that readers can gain a rounded understanding of how scientists build on what has gone before and how science flourished in different parts of the world, or in different disciplines at the same time.
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  • Decorated Pottery

    By Louise Spilsbury
    Authors:
    Louise Spilsbury
    Featuring six pieces of pottery from around the world, this book explores different types of story; from Greek legend in Pablo Picasso's Pan plaque to Chinese legend in the Fo porcelain lion-dog. Each piece of pottery is looked at in detail, and a more general introduction to the medium provides a historical context. Step-by-step projects show children how to create their own ceramic masterpieces, using the techniques of the art form. Cast a plaque, make a Nasca pot or produce your own plate!The Stories in Art series explores the narratives told through different art mediums. A great introduction to the history of art for children at Key Stage 2.
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    Dead End Kids: Heroes of the Blitz

    By Bernard Ashley
    Authors:
    Bernard Ashley
    London is at war and as the Blitz rages, children like Josie and her brother Len face the same dangers as the adults. Can they find the strength to stand up against the onslaught?A tale of amazing bravery, inspired by the true story of the Dead End Kids of Wapping - young people who fought fires and rescued their friends and neighbours from bomb sites. Perfect for fans of Michael Morpurgo, this dramatic story brings the Second World War vividly to life.
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  • The Dragon Path

    By Helen Moss
    Authors:
    Helen Moss
    A mysterious mission. A deadly secret.Can Ryan and Cleo survive the Dragon Path?Ryan Flint and Cleo McNeil are heading to China with their parents to examine an archaeological site. But when Cleo's grandmother tells them about a secret that haunts her past, they're plunged into a new mystery. Ryan thought he'd used up a lifetime's supply of adventure - now he's surrounded by fire-breathing dragons, ancient poisons and an army of terracotta warriors! Sometimes, just staying alive is an adventure . . .The second in a fantastic new series from the author of the Adventure Island books.
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    The Double Shadow

    By Sally Gardner
    Authors:
    Sally Gardner
    Arnold Ruben has created a memory machine, a utopia housed in a picture palace, where the happiest memories replay forever, a haven in which he and his precious daughter can shelter from the war-clouds gathering over 1937 Britain. But on the day of her 17th birthday Amaryllis leaves Warlock Hall and the world she has known and wakes to find herself in a desolate and disturbing place. Something has gone terribly wrong with her father's plan.Against the tense backdrop of the Second World War, Sally Gardner explores families and what binds them, fathers and daughters, past histories, passions and cruelty, love and devastation in a novel rich in character and beautifully crafted.
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  • Death and Disease

    By Alex Woolf
    Authors:
    Alex Woolf
    This title gives readers an in-depth look at death and disease in medieval times. You can find out what ordinary people did when they fell ill and discover the herbs and potions doctors used to treat the plague and other illnesses. It also tells you about the first medical schools in Europe and about how medicine progressed in five hundred years of medieval living. It includes contemporary written evidence, colour photographs and maps, a timeline, glossary and index.
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    The Devil in the Corner

    By Patricia Elliott
    Authors:
    Patricia Elliott
    Penniless, and escaping the horrors of life as a governess to brutal households, Maud seeks refuge with the cousin-by-marriage she never knew. But her efforts to please Juliana are met with increasing levels of contempt as it becomes apparent that Juliana is jealous of Maud's youth and beauty. Further, Juliana quashes Maud's emerging friendships with the staff and locals - especially John, the artist commissioned to restore the sinister Doom in the local church. John, however, is smitten with Maud and makes every effort to woo her.Maud, isolated and thwarted at every turn, continues to take the laudanum which was her only solace in London (and which was commonplace in Victorian London). Soon she becomes dependent on the drug - so is this the cause of her fresh anxieties? Or is someone - or something - plotting her demise? Is the devil in the corner of the Doom a reality, or a figment of her imagination? And what is its power?Will Maud ever learn the truth of her inheritance and be free? Will she lose John for ever?
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    Dear Jelly: Family Letters from the First World War

    By Sarah Ridley
    Authors:
    Sarah Ridley
    The moving story of two brothers who fought in the First World War through the real letters, complete with hand-drawn cartoons, they sent to their sisters. Like so many families across the world, the Semple family were split apart by the First World War. While William and Robert were fighting the Germans in France, their younger sisters, Mabel and Jelly (Eileen), had to carry on with school back in England. To keep in touch, they wrote letters. The sisters treasured these letters, which gave snapshots of their brothers' lives as soldiers. Many of the letters included cartoon illustrations to amuse the sisters.The book presents these letters with their illustrations. After each letter the author has written a short commentary, drawing out the facts about the war that can be taken from it. Altogether the book is a powerful and moving record of one family's experience of the First World War and a moving read for readers aged nine and up.A powerful, moving record of one family's first-hand experience of the First World War. - Education Today
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