index
Our Authors
J P Buxton

J.P. Buxton has taught English in an eccentric boarding school in Massachusetts, sold suitcases in Manhattan and worked for years as a copywriter in the United Kingdom. With four successful previous novels for adults under his belt, I Am The Blade is his first book for teenagers and draws on his passion for ancient history, landscape, and adventure stories.
Knife & Packer

Working together as a crack author-illustrator team, Knife and Packer have written and illustrated more than 30 books for children.Badly Drawn Beth
Elisa Paganelli

Elisa Paganelli was born in Modena (Italy), and since childhood cannot resist the smell of paper and pencils. She attended the Institute of Art and subsequently graduated from the European Institute of Design (IED) in Turin with a degree in illustration. As a post-grad, Elisa worked as a graphic designer for a communication agency. However she realized that this wasn't the life for her, so she decided to set up her own art and design studio. (She also ran a successful design shop for 6 years, but this is another story.)Elisa devotes most of her time to her passion for images and words. She thinks of herself as a kind of hermit, immersed in her quiet world of nature and books, accompanied by a cup of tea and her beloved pet-assistants. She now collaborates with publishers and advertising agencies all over the world, and also writes for a newspaper's lifestyle column.
Kate Pankhurst

Since graduating from the University of Central Lancashire, Kate Pankhurst has worked as an illustrator. She works regularly in primary and secondary schools running sessions linked to illustration and writing and as part of Creatives, a company specialising in high quality arts experiences for children and young people. Kate has previously illustrated both picture books and fiction for a variety of publishers. Kate was the recipient of the MACMILLAN PRIZE FOR PICTURE BOOK ILLUSTRATION in 2002. Kate lives and works in Leeds.Visit her website http://www.katepankhurst.com/ and follow her on Twitter @KateisDrawing
Victoria Parker

Victoria Parker grew up in Sutton Coldfield and went on to read English at Oxford. After having spent 10 years living in London and working for 6 of those in children's publishing, Vic decided to go freelance. She still teaches dance and fitness, a passion since she was young. She has had her work published by a number of other publishers including Belitha Press, Watts as well as of course Hodder.
Steve Parker

Steve Parker, ia an award-winning writer who worked for the Natural History Museum. He has written over 100 books, mostly for younger readers, on science, technology, machines and human biology. He regularly gives talks and workshops in schools and libraries.
Philip Parker

Philip Parker is a professional historian specialising in the ancient world.
Guy Parker-Rees

Guy Parker-Rees exuberant and energetic illustrations have made him a household name and one of today's bestselling children's illustrators. Notable successes include Giraffes Can't Dance - written by Giles Andreae, a worldwide besteller, and Richard & Judy children's book choice, Spookyrumpus, winner of the Sheffield, Dundee and Portsmouth book awards, and the highly acclaimed All Afloat on Noah's Boat. Guy lives in Brighton with his wife and three sons.
Siobhan Parkinson

Siobhán Parkinson is a novelist and one of Ireland's best-known writers for children. In 2010 she was appointed Ireland's first Children's Laureate and has written dozens of novels for children, young people and even a couple for adults. Her most recent are Bruised and its companion novel, Heart Shaped, for young teenagers. She is also a translator (from German) and she runs Little Island, a small children's publishing house. She lives in Dublin with a nice husband and a large computer. She is visually impaired, so she 'reads' mostly audiobooks.
Elif Balta Parks

Elif Balta Parks is a business graduate who's love of drawing lead her to change her life and become an illustrator. She studied independently for several years, developing her style and then attended Central Saint Martins college before beginning her career as an illustrator. Since 2012 Elif has illustrated over 30 children's books and is passionate about engaging young readers' imaginations with her work. She lives in more than one place but always has her sketchbook at her side.
Garry Parsons

Garry studied Fine Art at Canterbury and the Illustration Sequential Design MA at Brighton. He has illustrated many books and has won various awards, including the Red House Children's Book Award, the Stockport Schools Book Award, the Nottingham Children's Book Award and an AOI Images award.
Martin Parsons

Dr Martin Parsons is director of PGCE Secondary at the University of Reading. He has established a centre for evacuee studies at the university and has lectured on the topic at the Imperial War Museum and abroad. He has lived with his family in Southend Bradfield for a number fo years and is actively involved in village activities.
Pat-a-Cake

Pat-a-Cake takes you and your child on a magical journey. From sharing the very first baby book to watching your little one read all by themselves. The adventure begins here . . .
Alex Paterson

Alex was a soldier and a jungle leader before concentrating on his illustration career: following in the footsteps of his sister and cousin who are also both children's illustrators. He has had eleven books published so far. Alex lives in a little village in Warwickshire with his wife Sarah.
Jill Paton Walsh

Jill Paton Walsh is a distinguished writer, best-known for her adult novel, Knowledge of Angels, which was shortlisted for the 1994 Booker Prize. Among her many children's titles are The Dolphin Crossing (widely acknowledged as a modern classic); Gaffer Samson's Luck (Winner of the Smarties Prize); The Emperor's Winding Sheet (Winner of the Whitbread Award) and Thomas and the Tinners (Winner of the Smarties Prize).
Michelle Paver

Born in Malawi to a Belgian mother and a father who ran the tiny 'NYASALAND TIMES', Michelle Paver moved to the UK when she was three. She was brought up in Wimbledon and, following a Biochemistry Degree from Oxford, she became a partner in a big City law firm. She gave up the City to follow her long-held dream of becoming a writer. She is the author of the brilliantly successful children's series, THE CHRONICLES OF ANCIENT DARKNESS.Born in Malawi to a Belgian mother and a father who ran the tiny 'NYASALAND TIMES', Michelle Paver moved to the UK when she was three. She was brought up in Wimbledon and, following a Biochemistry Degree from Oxford, she became a partner in a big City law firm. She gave up the City to follow her long-held dream of becoming a writer. She is the author of the brilliantly successful children's series, THE CHRONICLES OF ANCIENT DARKNESS. DARK MATTER is her first adult ghost story. It arises from her lifelong love of the Arctic, which has taken her to northern Canada, Greenland, Scandinavia and Spitsbergen.
Jackson Pearce

Jackson Pearce currently lives in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with a slightly cross-eyed cat and a lot of second-hand furniture. She recently graduated from the University of Georgia with a degree in English and a minor in Philosophy. She auditioned for the circus once, but didn't make it; other jobs she's had include obituaries writer, biker bar waitress, and receptionist. Jackson began writing when she got angry that the school librarian couldn't tell her of a book that contained a smart girl, horses, baby animals, and magic. Her solution was to write the book herself when she was twelve. Her parents thought it was cute at first, but have grown steadily more concerned for her ever since.Sisters Red is Jackson's debut novel in the UK. Her first novel As You Wish has recieved rave reviews in the US.
Ridley Pearson

Ridley Pearson is the author of an acclaimed series of suspense thrillers for adults starring detective Lou Boldt, set in Seattle. He is also co-author of the recent Peter Pan sequel, Peter and the Starcatchers. He is married with children and lives in Missouri.
Maggie Pearson

My father was a brilliant story-teller. He had a very boring day-job, so exercised his mind making up long, involved (and often very funny) bedtime stories for my sister and me - with a cliff-hanger ending every night! On the rare occasions when he was stuck for ideas, he used to fall back on lesser-known folk tales. Re-telling traditional stories is still the kind of writing I most enjoy.At school I used the English essay subjects we were given as an excuse to write stories of my own, which weren't always appreciated. 'Write on the subject!' written in red and a mark of C+ was my first experience of rejection.My French teacher was more appreciative, which maybe explains why I ended up doing not English but French at university. Straight after graduation I married and settled down to be a full-time wife and mother - it was a straight choice in those days between motherhood or a career.Apart from some freelance journalism and a few stories for radio, my writing career was on hold until my three sons were grown up, at which point I decided it was now or never if I wanted to be a full-time writer.I was lucky enough to get my first book - a retelling of an old East Anglian folk tale - accepted by the second publisher I sent it to. Luckier still to get a review from Susan Hill, saying it deserved to become a children's classic. (It didn't, of course.)Since then I've published around thirty books, ranging from picture book texts to a teenage vampire novel.My first young teenage novel, 'Owl-light', was short-listed for the WH Smith Mind-Boggling Books award.My most recent one, 'Shadow of the Beast', was long-listed for the Carnegie Medal.Nowadays, I'm a book junkie. I buy more books than I can ever possibly read and enjoy all kinds, bar chick-lit and modern biography.My other interests include cryptic crosswords, going to the theatre and foreign travel.
Sam Penant

Sam Penant is a freelance travel writer and historical researcher who, in Hero 41, has amalgamated an early love of superhero comics with his grown-up fascination with 18th and 19th century prisons. Sam is bored with today's cinematic superheroes and all that CGI. He falls asleep during the endless climactic battles that are always won by muscle-bound characters in unbelievable costumes. The characters in Hero 41 are not super - yet - but they are heroes in the making. Ordinary girls and boys who learn to their astonishment that they possess powers of various kinds (some quite bizarre) that they must learn to use and control - in a semi-ruined prison that's been turned into a school for their benefit alone.