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Our Authors
Jane Lacey

Jane Lacey was a primary school teacher for ten years before she became a full-time writer of non-fiction books for children between the ages of three and eleven.
Amy Lamé

Amy Lamé is a writer, broadcaster, activist, and performer.She co-founded RVT Future, a voluntary LGBTQ+ community group campaigning to preserve the iconic Royal Vauxhall Tavern. Amy is the 2014 recipient of the Free Derry Pink Wall Award for her work for LGBTQ+ civil rights.Amy is a familiar presence on TV, in print and on radio. Originally from New Jersey, she has been a proud Londoner for over two decades. She currently serves as the Mayor of London's first Night Czar, overseeing the city's thriving night time economy and culture.
Stephen Law

Stephen Law was a school dropout who became a postman in Cambridge, then took a degree in philosophy at Oxford, becoming a Junior Research Fellow at the Queen's College. He now teaches philosophy at Heythrop College, University of London. He has published a number of books including The Philosophy Files, The Outer Limits and The Philosophy Gym.
Patrice Lawrence

Patrice Lawrence was born in Brighton and brought up in an Italian-Trinidadian household in Mid Sussex. Patrice lives in east London and shares a cat called Stormageddon. She has been writing for as long as she has been reading. She loves crime fiction, sci-fi and trying to grow things. Her ideal mixtape includes drum 'n' bass, Bruce Springsteen and Studio Ghibli soundtracks. Music can't help creeping into her books. Her debut novel, Orangeboy, won the Waterstone's Book Prize for Older Readers and the YA Book Prize, and her second novel, Indigo Donut, won the Crime Fest Best Crime Fiction for Young Adults and was shortlisted for the YA Book Prize. @LawrencePatrice
Sarah Levete

Sarah Levete has written numerous titles, on a lot of different subjects, for children. Her many books include educational titles for children about science, world affairs, religion, history and social issues. When she is not writing, Sarah also teaches young people and adults. She lives in Oxford with her husband and children.
Jamie Littler

Jamie is a St. Albans-based illustrator who graduated from the Arts Institute at Bournemouth in 2008, and won a High Commendation in the Macmillan Children's Book Award in the same year. Since then Jamie has worked with many varied clients, and his debut children's book, 'MUM'S THE WORD', written by Timothy Knapman, is to be published by Hodder Children's Books in 2013.He is the creator, writer and illustrator of the on-going comic series 'COGG & SPROKIT' which is serialised in the Phoenix Comic, and his debut fiction series 'ATOMIC!', published by Scholastic Children's Books, written and created by Guy Bass, was released in 2012. When not trying to tame his un-naturally fast growing hair, he likes drawing, colouring in, cutting things out and sticking things in. Whatever medium he uses, Jamie tries to create a 'hand-made', organic and energetic feeling in his work. His interests are pretty wide and varied; although he does have a soft spot for wild animals and things that go bump in the night.Jamie is represented by Jodie Marsh at United Agents.Jamie Littler graduated from the Arts Institute at Bournemouth in 2008. He has won a High Commendation Award at the Macmillan Children's Book Awards and is the creator of 'Cogg and Sprokit', which is serialised in the PHOENIX. He has worked on high-profile projects including The Famous Five. Follow him on Twitter @jamieillustrate or visit his website at http://jamielittler.co.uk/
Claire Llewellyn

Claire Llewellyn was an editor of children's fiction and non-fiction for over ten years before becoming a writer, specializing in books for younger readers. Her 'My First Book of Time' won TES Junior Information Book Award in 1992. Since then, she has written over 50 children's books on a wide range of subjects.
Sam Lloyd

'Mr Pusskins', Sam's first hilarious book for Orchard, won the Booktrust Early Years Award for Best Pre-School Book, was a New York Times bestseller and was shortlisted for the V&A Illustration Award and Sheffield Book Prize. She also created the brilliant Whoops-a-Daisy World series of books for Orchard, which started with 'Doctor Miaow's Big Emergency'. Sam has written and illustrated a number of novelty books including the Richard and Judy prize-winning 'Calm Down, Boris' for Templar. In 2008 Sam was Highly Commended in the Big Picture Campaign's Best New Illustrator Awards. Sam lives in Brighton.
Leonie Lord

Leonie Lord grew up in Gloucestershire and studied illustration at Central St Martins College, London.Since graduating she has worked in various different areas of illustration but has mainly produced editorial work, contributing regularly for newspapers such as The Sunday Telegraph and The Guardian.Leonie has a young family, which has recently renewed her love of children's books, inspiring a world in which anything and everything is possible and probably about to happen any minute. This has led her to illustrate for children herself; The Dirty Great Dinosaur being her first illustrated book for children.After spells in London and Sydney, Leonie now lives in Cheltenham in an upside-down house with her husband and two children.
Anita Loughrey

Anita Loughrey was a primary school teacher for seventeen years before becoming a full-time writer. She writes teacher resources, educational fiction and non-fiction on a wide variety of subjects for a wide range of publishers with over 85 books published in the UK and many more worldwide. She writes for the national writing magazine Writers' Forum and teaches creative writing.Anita's favourite toy as a child was the typewriter she wrote her autobiography with at the age of ten. As nothing exciting ever happened, she made most of it up. Her interests include writing, reading children's books, knitting, jive dancing and camping with her family in their VW campervan. She reckons there is nothing better than sleeping under the stars and cooking in the great outdoors, as long as it isn't raining.
Dan Lyndon

Dan Lyndon has been teaching for over 15 years, and is former head of history at Henry Compton School, London. He is a member of the Black and Asian Studies Association (BASA).
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