index
Our Authors
Ronda Armitage

Ronda Armitage was born in New Zealand, and later moved to London with her husband and children. Her first book, The Lighthouse Keeper's Lunch, soon became a popular series of books. Ronda has gone on to write many much-loved stories for children, including A Very Strange Creature and the fabulous Small Knight and George series about a little knight and his pet dragon. Ronda lives in East Sussex with her husband, David.
Bernard Ashley

Bernard Ashley is one of the top writers for teenagers today. Drawing on his experience as a headteacher in a South London school he writes exciting, hard-hitting stories for the young adult reader plus picture book and younger fiction texts.Bernard's first novel, The Trouble with Donovan Croft, won the 'Other Award', an alternative to the Carnegie Award. Since then he has written extensively both for television and the children's book market. His adaptation of his own novel Dodgem won the Royal Television Society Award for the Best Children's Entertainment Programme. Bernard has written a number of successful novels for Orchard Books. Tiger Without Teeth was chosen as the Guardian's Children's Book of the Week; Little Soldier, about the gang-run estates of inner London, was shortlisted for both the Carnegie and Guardian Fiction Award; and Revenge House, a hard-hitting crime thriller, are all typical of Bernard's highly charged, gritty approach.Bernard Ashley lives in South East London only a street or so from where he was born. During his time as a teacher and headteacher he worked in Kent, Hertfordshire, Newham and Greenwich.Visit Bernard Ashley at: www.bashley.com
Chloe Bennet

'Chloe Bennet' is the pseudonym of a highly experienced author and former publisher. The BOYWATCHING books are her first for children.
Kendare Blake

Kendare Blake is an import from South Korea who was raised in the United States. She received a Bachelor's degree in Business from Ithaca College and a Master's degree in Writing from Middlesex University in London. She brakes for animals, the largest of which was a deer, which sadly didn't make it, and the smallest of which was a mouse, which did, but it took forever. Amongst her likes are Greek Mythology, rare red meat and veganism. She also enjoys girls who can think with the boys like Ayn Rand, and boys who scare the morality into people, like Bret Easton Ellis.
Virginia Boecker

Virginia Boecker recently spent four years in London obsessing over English medieval history. She now lives in the Bay Area, California with her husband and spends her days writing, reading, running, and chasing around her two children and a dog named George. In addition to English kings, nine-day queens, and Protestant princesses, her other obsessions include The Smiths, art museums, champagne, and Chapstick. You can visit Virginia online at virginiaboecker.com or on Twitter @virgboecker.
Irena Brignull

Irena Brignull is a successful screenwriter. Since working on the screenplay of The Boxtrolls, Irena has been writing an adaptation of The Little Prince directed by Mark Osborne and starring Jeff Bridges, Rachel McAdams and Marion Cotillard. Previously, Irena was a Script Executive at the BBC and then Head of Development at Dogstar Films where she was the script editor on Shakespeare in Love, Captain Corelli's Mandolin and Bravo Two Zero to name a few. Irena holds a BA in English Literature from Oxford University. The Hawkweed Prophecy is her first novel.
Vincent Caldey

Vincent Caldey's creative interests have always involved music, but he has recently branched out into writing. His stories for young adults explore the darker side of adolescence. He cites Raymond Carver and Iain Banks as two of his major influences.
Ally Carter

Ally Carter writes books about spies, thieves, and teenagers. She is the New York Times Best-selling author of Heist Society, Uncommon Criminals, and the popular Gallagher Girls series, including I'd Tell You I Love You but Then I'd Have to Kill You, Cross My Heart and Hope to Spy, Don't Judge a Girl by Her Cover, and Only the Good Spy Young.She lives in the Midwest where her life is either very ordinary or the best deep-cover legend ever. She'd tell you more, but...well...you know...
Lucy Coats

Lucy Coates worked as a children's book editor before becoming a full-time writer, poet and journalist. She has two children and lives in Northamptonshire.Lucy lives with her husband and two children deep in the Northamptonshire countryside, surrounded by cows, sheep, horses, owls, foxes, four lunatic dogs and a large and demanding garden. She has been fascinated by childrenOs books ever since she can remember, and cannot imagine a better job than making up stories and poems for a living. When she is not writing she grows organic vegetables, cooks huge meals for her family, and sits in her stone circle, studying the moon and stars.Lucy Coats read English and Ancient History at Edinburgh University, then worked in children's publishing and now writes full-time. She is a gifted children¿s poet and has also written picture books and novels. She is widely respected for her lively retellings of myths. Lucy's website is at www.lucycoats.com. You can also follow her on Facebook http://tinyurl.com/lucycoatsfacebook and Twitter http://www.twitter.com/lucycoats
Michael Coleman

Michael claims that English was his worst subject at school; his burning ambition was to become a footballer but his dreams were never realised and he went on to study Maths and Computer Science at university.Humour is at the heart of everything that Michael does: he sees it as the 'antidote' to his very technical and non-creative career. Michael's first book was excitingly entitled Disk Programming Techniques for the BBC Microcomputer, and finding that he enjoyed writing the jokes more than the rest, Michael decided to try leaving out the computer bits. In 1993 Michael decided to concentrate full-time on his writing (apart from when he's day-dreaming about football).In 1997 Michael's novel for older children Weirdo's War was shortlisted for the Carnegie Children's Book Award, the Lancashire Children's Book Award and the Writers Guild Award.
Chris d'Lacey

Chris d'Lacey is the author of the The Last Dragon Chronicles and the Dragons of Wayward Crescent series. He likes dragons. He was born in Malta, but now lives in Devon with his wife, Jay, and about three hundred teddy bears. He likes teddy bears, too. After graduating from York University with a Biology degree, he went to Leicester University where he worked for twenty-eight years as a research scientist, mainly looking down microscopes. He now writes full time.In his spare moments, he likes to watch TV and walk by the sea - though not necessarily at the same time. His passion is writing and recording songs. His ultimate ambition is to write a song that will feature on the soundtrack of a movie of the dragon books, always assuming a movie is made.Presently, he is working on two new projects, both of which feature dragons to some extent.
C. G. Drews

C.G. Drews lives in Australia with her dog, a piano, and the goal of reading every book in existence. Consequently, her brain has overflowed with words and she spends her days writing novel after novel. She blogs at paperfury.com, never sleeps, and believes in cake for breakfast.
Alan Durant

Alan Durant writes fiction for all ages, from picture books and young fiction to teenage thrillers and poetry for adults. His titles include the award-winning Burger Boy, illustrated by Mei Matsuoka, and Kate Greenaway-nominated Always and Forever, illustrated by Debi Gliori.
Sara Holland

Sara Holland grew up in small-town Minnesota among hundreds of books. After graduating from university, she worked in a tea shop, a dentist's office, and a state capitol building before heading to New York to work in publishing. These days, she can be found exploring the city's bookstores and consuming too much caffeine.You can find her at:www.sarahollandwrites.comTwitter - @Sara_HollandInstagram - @sarahollandwrites
Belinda Hollyer

Belinda grew up in a small harbour town in New Zealand: a glorious place to be a child. She shared a pony with her sisters, and spent most of her time reading, riding, and playing on the beach at the bottom of their road. (Even now, tidal water still tugs at her imagination.) Career-wise, Belinda has enjoyed different combinations of children and books - as a teacher, a librarian, a book publisher, and now as an almost-full-time writer. She has lived in Beirut, and Melbourne, and on the south coast in England, and now she mostly divides her time between London and Key West (in Florida). Belinda lives in Primrose Hill, North London, with her partner, Bruce.
Anthony Horowitz

Anthony Horowitz was born in 1955 and sent to Orley Farm, a particularly vicious boy's preparatory school in North London, which gave him his first taste of horror. Afterwards he went to Rugby School and York University. He is probably known as a screen writer and his work includes Foyle's War, Murder in Mind, Midsomer Murders, Menace and Agatha Christie's Poirot. "I've always liked horror," Anthony says. "I love those dark things that are always just out of sight . . . in the corner of your eye." But he is equally at ease with comedy, thrillers and even spy fantasies . . . his Alex Rider series has enjoyed worldwide success. All in all, he has written over twenty books for children.For Orchard Books Anthony has written Horowitz Horror and More Horowitz Horror, two collection of scary short stories that will make your spine tingle! The stories are also available individually as Pocket Horowitz paperbacks.Anthony lives in North London with his wife and two sons, Nicholas and Cassian.
Leo Hunt

Leo Hunt was born in Newcastle upon Tyne in 1991. He grew up around books, and his mother's job at Seven Stories in Newcastle left a strong impression on his choice of career. He realised he wanted to either be an author or an archeologist - but when he learned that archaeologists didn't unearth piles of perfectly preserved dinosaur bones every time they put a spade in the ground, he decided on the former. Leo started writing his debut novel, Thirteen Days of Midnight when he was 19, in his first year at the University of East Anglia. It went on to be shortlisted for the 2016 Waterstones Children's Book Prize. He currently lives in London.
R J Anderson

Rebecca Anderson was born in Uganda, raised in Ontario, went to school in New Jersey, and has spent much of her life dreaming of other worlds entirely.As a child she immersed herself in fairy tales, mythology, and the works of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien and E. Nesbit; later she discovered more contemporary authors like Ursula LeGuin, Patricia A. McKillip and Robin McKinley, and learned to take as much pleasure from their language as the stories they told. Now married and the mother of three young sons, Rebecca reads to her children the classic works of fantasy and science fiction that enlivened her own childhood, and tries to bring a similar sense of humour, adventure, and timeless wonder to the novels she writes for children and young adults.
Sharon Jones

Undiscovered Voices 2012 winner, Sharon Jones, has been writing since childhood. While studying for a degree in politics and then a Masters in theology, she worked in two independent bookshops where she developed a love of young adult fiction. Sharon gained a doctorate in the theology of story whilst being den mother to 500 undergraduates and has taught courses on everything from the philosophy of education to the history of Neo-Paganism. Having lived in Liverpool, Cambridge, Warwick and Colchester, she now lives back in her native Lancashire with a giant white poodle, Harvey.
Brian Keaney

Brian was born in London. His parents were Irish and he grew up listening to his mother's tales of the life she had left behind in Ireland. That was how he learned to love stories. He was sent to a very strict school where boys were beaten if they stepped out of line. He hated the place but he enjoyed English lessons because they gave him a chance to write down the stories that filled his head. He went to Liverpool University where he studied English and fell in love with a girl called Rosie. After leaving university he married Rosie and they had two children. By day he worked as a teacher, in the evenings he read stories to his children, and in the night he carried on writing his stories. When he had enough stories to make a book he sent them off to a publisher who offered to publish them. He immediately gave up his job to concentrate on writing. That was one of the silliest things he has ever done since he was totally broke for a very long time afterwards. But it was also one of the smartest things he has ever done because somehow he succeeded in making a career for himself as a writer. His favourite pastime is reading (though his favourite book changes all the time). His favourite city is Rome and he adores Italian food. His favourite journey is any one that finishes at home and his favourite sound is his grandson's voice on the telephoneBrian has won the Havering Best of the Best Award, a Lancashire Fabulous Book Award and he has been shortlisted for a the NASEN Book Award, the South Lanarkshire Children's Book Award, the North East Book Award and the Bedfordshire Children's Book Award. His novels have been translated into twelve languages.