Related to: '7-9 Years'

Franklin Watts

Beowulf

Steve Barlow, Steve Skidmore, Andrew Tunney
Contributors:
Steve Barlow, Steve Skidmore, Andrew Tunney

Hot spin-off from the I HERO series, YOU are a famous character of legend! Written by the award-winning 2Steves!You are the hero of this book. Only you can decide your own destiny...

Orchard Books

I Am Not Sleepy and I Will Not Go to Bed

Lauren Child
Authors:
Lauren Child
Orchard Books

Clarice Bean, That's Me

Lauren Child
Authors:
Lauren Child
Orchard Books

I Am Not Sleepy and I Will Not Go to Bed

Lauren Child
Authors:
Lauren Child

Charlie has this little sister Lola. Sometimes he has to try and get her to go to bed. This is a hard job because Lola likes to stay up late. Lola says, "I am not slightly sleepy at 6 or 7 or 8. I am still wide awake at 9 and not at all tired at 10, 11 and 12 and I will probably still be perky at even 13 o'clock in the morning."For the first time, this bestselling Charlie and Lola story is available as a chunky board book that's just right for little hands. This wonderfully imaginative bedtime tale is perfect for sharing with the very youngest Charlie and Lola fans.

Orchard Books

The Teenage Years

Jamie Thomson
Authors:
Jamie Thomson

Thirteen-year-old schoolboy, Dirk Lloyd, has a dark secret - in fact he is a dark secret. Dirk - according to his own account - is the earthly incarnation of a Dark Lord, supreme ruler of the Darklands and leader of great armies of orcs and warriors, intent on destruction and bloody devastation. Following a colossal final battle between the forces of good and evil, the Dark Lord was defeated and hurled by his arch-foe's spells into the Pit of Uttermost Despair. At the bottom of the Pit lies...a supermarket car park in the municipal town of Whiteshields, somewhere in modern day England. And when he is found, and tries to explain that he is the Dark Lord, people think he means Dirk Lloyd. The fact that he's trapped in the puny body of a schoolboy doesn't help. And so begins Dirk's battle to recover his dignity, his power, and his lands... Along the way he faces the inconvenience of being fostered by a do-gooding family, the Purejoies; the torture of endless hours of drudgery at the Whiteshields Brainwashing Centre (aka school); a vengeful Headmaster; two interfering Psychotic Persecutors (psychotherapists); and constant laughter and disrespect when he attempts to marshall his lackeys and lickspittles (friends) to do what he wants them to.Dirk makes friends with the son of his foster family, Christopher, and the local Goth Girl, Sooz, and together they attempt to cast a spell that will transport Dirk back to his homeland. Inevitably, not everything goes to plan... But that's for book 2Roald Dahl Prize winner, 2012.

Orchard Books

Boys Are Ok!

Jean Ure
Authors:
Jean Ure

Meet the girlfriends! Polly, Keri, Frizz and Lily. They're the Gang of Four, and they're going to stick together for ever and ever!When Polly gets back from summer camp it seems that all her friends have grown up and left her behind. Even Frizz is wearing a bra! And they keep inviting boys to their parties.Are boys really OK?

Orchard Books

Pink Knickers Aren't Cool

Jean Ure
Authors:
Jean Ure

Meet Polly, Keri, Frizz and Lily - they're the Gang of Four, and they're determined to be best friends for ever! Their bond of friendship is severely tested, though, when they discover that they are all going off to different schools in the autumn. And poor Frizz is going to be left with their arch enemy, Jessamy James, a show-off who wears pink knickers, which they all know isn't cool! A lively and humorous story perfect for top junior girls facing the momentous change to secondary school.

Orchard Books

Girls Stick Together!

Jean Ure
Authors:
Jean Ure

Meet Polly, Keri, Frizz and Lily - they're the Gang of Four, and they're determined to be best friends for ever! Inevitably things have changed now the girls are all at different schools, and Polly has to take some hard decisions about remaining loyal to Frizz, or teaming up with her new friend, Chloe. Will she decide that friends have to stick together? The second story in this lively and humorous series perfect for junior girls facing the momentous change to secondary school.

Orchard Books

Girls Are Groovy!

Jean Ure
Authors:
Jean Ure
Hodder Children's Books

7-9 Years

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Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

Teri Terry

Teri Terry arrived on the children’s book radar last year with her debut novel Slated, which was immediately shortlisted for a number of prizes, and has recently won the 14-16 category of the Leeds Book Awards. Here she talks to Graham Marks about the extraordinary journey she has taken to become an author – a story almost worthy of a book itself.

Orchard Books

9-11 Years

View all our books for 9-11 year olds here...

Orchard Books

5-7 Years

View all our books for 5-7 year olds...

Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

Chris Higgins

Chris Higgins is an ex English and Drama teacher turned award-winning writer. She has written the My Funny Family series for younger readers, but is probably best known for her teen novels, which have gained her two nominations for Queen of Teen. Here she talks to Graham Marks about how she became a writer, tells us some of her writing secrets and talks about her latest novel, The Day I Met Suzie.

Press Release

Jamie Thompson's ' The Dark Lord' Wins Roald Dahl Funny Prize 2012

Orchard Books is thrilled to announce that Jamie Thomson, author of Dark Lord: The Teenage Years is a Roald Dahl Funny Prize winner 2012 in the 7-14 category.

Press Release

SLA Second Information Book Award

The School Library Association is delighted to announce the Information Book Award 2012 is opening for submissions on 20th February, sponsored by Hachette Children’s Books.

Hodder Children's Books

9-11 Years

View all our books for 9-11 year olds...

Wikipedia

Michael Rosen

Michael Wayne Rosen (born 7 May 1946)[1] is a broadcaster, children's novelist and poet and the author of 140 books. He was appointed as the fifth Children's Laureate in June 2007, succeeding Jacqueline Wilson, and held this honour until 2009. Michael Rosen was born in Harrow, London. The family background is Jewish, "from the Jewish East End tradition" as Rosen puts it.[2] Rosen's father Harold (1919–2008) was born in Brockton, Massachusetts, in the United States to Communist parents and settled in the East End of London at the age of two, when his mother returned to the country of her birth.[3] While a member of the Young Communist League he met Connie Isakofsky, his future wife and Michael Rosen's mother, in 1935. Harold was a secondary school teacher before becoming a professor of English at the Institute of Education, London,[4] and Connie a primary school teacher before becoming a training college lecturer; she also broadcast for the BBC. Producing a programme featuring poetry, she persuaded her son to write for it, and used some of the material he submitted.[5] Their ancestors came from Poland, Russia and Romania.[2] Michael Rosen was brought up in Pinner, Middlesex, and went to various state schools in Pinner, Harrow, and then Watford Grammar School for Boys,[2] and, having discovered the range of Jonathan Miller, thought: "Wouldn't it be wonderful to know all about science, and know all about art, and be funny and urbane and all that."[6] Subsequently, in his own words: After graduating from Wadham College, Oxford, in 1969, Rosen became a graduate trainee at the BBC. Among the work that he did while there in the 1970s was presenting a series on BBC Schools television called WALRUS (Write And Learn, Read, Understand, Speak). He was also scriptwriter on the children's reading series Sam on Boffs' Island. But Rosen found working for the corporation frustrating: "Their view of 'educational' was narrow. The machine had decided this was the direction to take. Your own creativity was down the spout."[7] Despite previously having made no secret of his radical politics he was asked to go freelance in 1972, though in practice he was sacked despite several departments of the BBC wishing to employ him. In common with the China expert and journalist Isabel Hilton among several others at this time, Rosen had failed the vetting procedures which were then in operation. This long-standing practice was only revealed in 1985.[8] In 1974 Mind Your Own Business, his first book of poetry for children, was published. In due course, Rosen established himself with his collections of humorous verse for children, including Wouldn't You Like to Know, You Tell Me and Quick Let's Get Out of Here. Educationalist Morag Styles has described Rosen as "one of the most significant figures in contemporary children's poetry". He was, says Styles, one of the first poets "to draw closely on his own childhood experiences ... and to 'tell it as it was' in the ordinary language children actually use".[7] Rosen played a key role in opening up children's access to poetry: both through his own writing and with important anthologies such as Culture Shock. He was one of the first poets to make visits to schools throughout the UK and further afield in Australia, Canada and Singapore.[7] His tours continue to enthuse and engage school children about poetry in the present.[9] In 1993, he gained an M.A. in Children's Literature from the University of Reading; he also holds a Ph.D. from the University of North London.[10] He is well established as a broadcaster, presenting a range of documentary features on British radio. He is the presenter of BBC Radio 4's regular magazine programme Word of Mouth which looks at the English language and the way it is used.[11] The English Association has given Michael Rosen's Sad Book an Exceptional Award for the Best Children's Illustrated Books of 2004, in the 4–11 age range. The book was written by Michael Rosen and illustrated by Quentin Blake. It deals in part with bereavement, and followed the publication of Carrying the Elephant: A Memoir of Love and Loss which was published in November 2002 after the death of his son Eddie, who features as a child in much of his earlier poetry. In 2004, Rosen published This Is Not My Nose: A Memoir of Illness and Recovery, an account of his ten years with undiagnosed hypothyroidism; a course of drugs in 1981 alleviated the condition.[7] Rosen has also been involved in campaigning around issues of education and for the Palestinian cause. He has written columns for the newspaper of the Socialist Workers Party (Socialist Worker)[12] and spoken at their conferences.[13] He has also stood for election in June 2004 in London as a Respect Coalition candidate.[5] He is also a supporter of the Republic campaign.[14] Rosen was the subject of the BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs programme on 6 August 2006.[15] He is currently Visiting Professor of Children's Literature at Birkbeck, University of London, where he teaches Children's Literature and has devised an MA in Children's Literature, which commenced in October 2010.[16] In August 2010 Rosen contributed to an eBook collection of political poems entitled Emergency Verse - Poetry in Defence of the Welfare State edited by Alan Morrison[17] In 2011, he collaborated with his wife, Emma-Louise Williams to produce the film 'Under the Cranes'; he provided the original screenplay (a 'play for voices' called 'Hackney Streets') which Williams took as a basis with which to direct the film. It premiered at the Rio Cinema, Dalston, London on April 30, 2011 as part of the East End Film Festival[18] Rosen was appointed as the fifth Children's Laureate in June 2007, succeeding Jacqueline Wilson,[19] and held this honour till 9 June 2009, being succeeded by Anthony Browne.[20] Rosen signed off from the Laureateship with an article in The Guardian,[21] in which he said, poignantly: "Sometimes when I sit with children when they have the space to talk and write about ... things, I have the feeling that I am privileged to be the kind of person who is asked to be part of it". In summer 2007, Rosen was awarded an Honorary D.Litt at the University of Exeter.[22] On 19 January 2008, Rosen was presented with an Honorary Doctorate of Letters from the Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust and the University of East London at a ceremony held at the Institute of Education.[23] On 5 November 2008, he was presented with an Honorary Masters degree at the University of Worcester.[24] On 18 November 2008, he was presented with the Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (Knight of the Order of Arts and Literature) by the Government of France at the French Ambassador's residence in London.[25] On 2 April 2010 he was given the Fred and Anne Jarvis Award by the National Union of Teachers for "campaigning for education".[26] On 22 July 2010, Michael Rosen was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Education (DEd) by Nottingham Trent University.[27] On April 5, 2011, he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate at the Institute of Education, University of London.[28] On 20 July 2011, Michael Rosen was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters by the University of the West of England.[29] Rosen has been married three times, and is the father of five children and two stepchildren. With his first partner, Susannah, he had two sons: Joe (born 1976) and Eddie (born 1980, died 1999). His second partner, whom he does not name, had two daughters from her previous relationship: Naomi (born 1978) and Laura (born 1983).[30] He had one son with her: Isaac (born 1987). Rosen currently lives in Dalston, Hackney, London with his wife Emma-Louise Williams and their two children, Elsie (born 2001) and Emile (born 2004).[31][32]

Hodder Children's Books

5-7 Years

View all our books for 5-7 year olds...