Related to: 'Sunburst'

Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

Jane Simmons

Jane Simmons is a uniquely talented award-winning illustrator and author, and the creator of some of our best-loved children’s books. Here she talks to Graham Marks about boats, motorbikes and making a mess, as well as her words, her art and her latest picture book, Lily Gets Lost.

Hodder Children's Books

Volcano

Nicholas Fisk
Authors:
Nicholas Fisk

When the Starstormers accidentally blast off into space they head for the relative safety of the strange and unwelcoming planet of Volcano. Here they are delighted to be joined by their old allies - the veils of Moloch - who prove surprisingly useful. But they soon discover that the Octopus Emperor - determined to enslave or destroy them - is still pursuing them relentlessly. And under his influence the planet and its inhabitants are becoming increasingly hostile. Finally, Ispex comes up with a plan to destroy the Emperor once and for all. Something so far-fetched that it might just work. But is there time before the Tyrannopolis battleship strikes its final, fatal blows? And can the Starstormers make the huge sacrifice the plan demands?

Hodder Children's Books

Evil Eye

Nicholas Fisk
Authors:
Nicholas Fisk

Once again forced to flee from the wicked Octopus Emperor in their junkyard spaceship, the four Starstormers crashland on the planet of Moloch - otherwise known as the planet of the Evil Eye. They soon begin to wonder if this unwelcoming planet as its terrifying - yet somehow almost familiar - inhabitants, hold anything for them except death. Then strange voices reveal to Vawn that the hostile planet is linked with an early space experiment from Earth that went horribly wrong. The Starstormers may be able to help restore a balance between good and evil - but can Vawn convince her friends that she is not imagining things? And have they really arrived in time to destroy the evil of Moloch?

Hodder Children's Books

Catfang

Nicholas Fisk
Authors:
Nicholas Fisk

Built to take the four children to join their parents on Epsilon Cool, Starstormer is showing dangerous signs of wear and tear - and the vehicle of their escape is now their prison. The Starstormers have been forced to leave Epsilon Cool to evade the Octopus Emperor's intention of employing them in his workforce, and the failings of their homemade spaceship contribute to the strained atmosphere on board. As tensions rise, distraction suddenly appears in the shape of a stowaway: a tousled, spiky, wet, filthy kitten. Cleaned up (and given a name), Fang, he entertains the children with his antics. But not for long! Starstormer is once again under attack - and Fang plays an amazing part in the great battle in space ...

Hodder Children's Books

Starstormers

Nicholas Fisk
Authors:
Nicholas Fisk

Four children, Vawn, Ispex, Tsu and Makenzi live in a boarding school on Earth, while their parents are busy building a colony on the planet Epsilon Cool. It has been years since they last saw their parents - perhaps they never will. Bored and frustrated, they decide to build their own spaceship out of parts salvaged from a spacecraft junkyard. They name their ship Starstormer and blast off. Weeks later, soaring through space on route to Epsilon Cool, they come across an ancient colony ship from earth called the Conqueror. The inhabitants have developed a strange religion, worshipping the "Glorious Ones," whoever they are. Ispex is first to figure out that there is great peril here for the Starstormers. The first book in Nicholas Fisk's exciting series, first published in the 1980s and warmly remembered by fans to this day.

Piers Torday

Piers Torday began his career in theatre and then television as a producer and writer. His bestselling first book for children, The Last Wild, was shortlisted for the Waterstones Children's Book Award and nominated for the CILIP Carnegie Medal as well as numerous other awards. His second book, The Dark Wild, won the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize. His most recent book for children, There May Be A Castle, was published in October 2016 to critical acclaim and was a Children's Book of the Year for The Times. The son of the late Paul Torday (author of Salmon Fishing in the Yemen) Piers recently completed his father's final unfinished novel, The Death of an Owl. He also adapted John Masefield's classic The Box of Delights for stage in 2017. In regular demand as a speaker at schools and festivals, Piers is also a reading helper with Beanstalk, a former judge on the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize, a Patron of Reading at Heathmere School and a trustee of the Pleasance Theatre. Born in Northumberland, Piers now lives in London with his husband and their dog Huxley.

Pippa Curnick

Pippa Curnick grew up in rural Essex and studied at Camberwell College of Art. She graduated from the University of Derby with a First Class degree in illustration. Her website is www.pippacurnick.com and you can follow her on twitter @PippaCurnick

Ronda Armitage

Ronda Armitage was born in New Zealand, and later moved to London with her husband and children. Her first book, The Lighthouse Keeper's Lunch, soon became a popular series of books. Ronda has gone on to write many much-loved stories for children, including A Very Strange Creature and the fabulous Small Knight and George series about a little knight and his pet dragon. Ronda lives in East Sussex with her husband, David.

Ronne Randall

Ronne Randall, originally from New York, has worked in children's publishing since 1980 and has been a freelance editor and author since 1993. She has written more than 150 children's books, published on both sides of the Atlantic. She has a special interest in folklore and fairy tales, and she has an MA in Folklore from Sheffield University. She is married, with one son, and lives in Nottinghamshire, England.

Rose Impey

Rose Impey, a former teacher, is highly regarded as a writer for children of all ages. She has written several novels and many bestselling series for Orchard, including Titchy Witch and Animal Crackers. Rose is also the creator of the bestselling Sleepover Club books, which became a major children's television series.

Rosie Banks

Rosie Banks is the author of brilliant series Secret Princesses and Secret Kingdom. You can find out all about Secret Princesses and much more at the series website: http://www.secretprincessesbooks.co.uk

Roy Apps

Roy Apps is the author of more than fifty children's books, including The Twitches, Fang Gang and How To Handle. He is the author of the highly successful Dream to Win series for Franklin Watts.His novel The Secret Summer of Daniel Lyons won The Writers' Guild Children's Book Award and was shortlisted for the Whitbread Awards. It is now a successful musical.Roy writes extensively for radio, theatre and TV. In 2001 he was awarded a BAFTA for his children's TV work, which includes Byker Grove, The Ghost Hunter and Barmy Aunt Boomerang.Roy visits schools, libraries and bookshops to read from his books and to share the secrets of The Shed in Your Head . He runs Writing Projects for all ages and over the last few years has helped young and new writers make books, stage plays, films, performance poetry and most recently, an opera.

Ryan Graudin

Ryan Graudin was born in Charleston, South Carolina with a severe case of wanderlust. When she's not travelling, she's busy photographing weddings, writing and spending time with her husband and wolf-dog. You can visit her website at ryangraudin.com, follow her on Twitter @ryangraudin and find out more about the world of THE WALLED CITY at ryangraudin.tumblr.com

Sally Gardner

Sally Gardner is an award-winning novelist from London. Her books have been translated into 22 languages and have sold more than one million copies in the UK. Her historical novel for older readers, I, Coriander, won the Smarties Children's Book Prize in 2005. Two thrillers both set at the time of the French Revolution, The Red Necklace and The Silver Blade, which was shortlisted for the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize in 2009, followed. Actor Dominic West (The Wire) has bought the film rights to both titles. Her YA novel, The Double Shadow, was published in 2011 to critical acclaim. Sally Gardner's stories for middle readers include Lucy Willow and the popular Magical Children series of six titles: The Strongest Girl in the World, The Invisible Boy, The Boy with Magic Numbers, The Smallest Girl in the World, The Boy with the Lightning Feet, and The Boy who could Fly, which are also available as audio books. She has also written and illustrated picture books including The Fairy Catalogue, The Glass Heart, The Book of Princesses and Playtime Rhymes. Sally Gardner continues to be an avid spokesperson for dyslexia, working to change the way it is perceived by society. She is dyslexic and argues that it is not a disability, but a gift.Her website is www.sallygardner.net and you can follow her on Twitter @TheSallyGardner

Sara Vogler

Jan and Sara were already friends when one day they decided they wanted to write children's stories and it would be more fun to write them together. That was 18 years ago. Since then they've written over 160 stories - including some about ghosts, football, ghosts playing football and naughty gargoylz. Jan lives in Essex with her family and Sara lives in London with hers. They both have black cats who completely rule their lives. For more information, please visit Jan and Sara's website www.burchettandvogler.co.uk and follow them on Twitter at https://twitter.com/BurchettVogler. Keep up-to-date with the Sam Silver: Undercover Pirate blog at http://samsilverundercoverpirate.blogspot.co.uk.

Sarah Horne

Sarah grew up in Derbyshire, mainly under a snow drift. She spent much of her childhood scampering in the nearby fields with a few goats. Then she decided to be sensible and studied Illustration at Falmouth College of Arts, graduating in 2001. She has illustrated for many different projects including an ad campaign for Kew Gardens entitled 'Plantastic Play'. She has also undertaken commission from The Guardian and The Independent newspapers. Sarah now specialises in funny, inky illustration and words for children's fiction and picture books. Sarah likes to paint on very big canvas. She loves funny detail, colour, music, dreams and big open spaces. Sarah now works from a studio on a hill in Forest Hill, London.

Sarah Mlynowski

Sarah Mlynowski started writing books when she was three years old. Kind of. She would tell them and her mom would transcribe them. They were all about Princesses named Sarah. After learning to use her own pencil, she continued scribbling stories throughout elementary and high school, and studied English literature in college.When she was twenty-four she published her first chick lit novel, Milkrun. Since then she has written five novels for teens, four additional novels for adults, co-written a guide to writing chick lit (See Jane Write), co-edited two bestselling charity collections, and contributed to various anthologies. Originally from Montreal, Sarah now lives in Manhattan.

Sarah Moore Fitzgerald

Sarah Moore Fitzgerald was born in New York in 1965 but grew up in Co. Dublin. She's a professor of Creative Writing at the University of Limerick. She runs regular writers' retreats for academics and students in Ireland and internationally.Follow her on Twitter @SMooreFitz

Sarah Prineas

Sarah Prineas is from Iowa City, where she works at the University. She is married to John Prineas, a physics professor, and she says the evil device in Magic Thief bears a striking resemblance to some of his laboratory equipment. They have two children. The Magic Thief is her first novel.

Sarah Warburton

Sarah has many books, working for a large variety of publishers. With author Hiawyn Oram, she created the Orchard Books' character of Rumblewick - the witch's familiar - employed by a very unwilling witch. Both in picture book and fiction this character has sold worldwide and is under movie option with DreamWorks. Sarah also illustrated the 'Happy Ever After' series, written by Tony Bradman, as well as the picture book 'Sir Laughalot', written by Tony Mitton for Orchard. Sarah works using a wide combination of pencil sketches, digital colour and traditional pen and ink and watercolour. She lives in Bristol, with her husband and two children.

Saviour Pirotta

Saviour Pirotta has written over 100 children's books, ranging from picture books to novels. He has been fascinated by traditional tales since he was a child, and before becoming a full-time writer he worked as a storyteller for the Commonwealth Institute in London. His titles include The Orchard Book of First Greek Myths and The Orchard Book of Grimm's Fairy Tales. He lives in Saltaire, West Yorkshire.