Related to: 'Nathaniel Wolfe and the Bodysnatchers'

Author Spotlight with Graham Marks

Emmy Laybourne

Emmy Laybourne is, in her own words, ‘a writer, teacher and a recovering character actress’ who lives in upstate New York with her husband ‘and two surprisingly well-mannered children’. Here she talks to Graham Marks, on Skype, about how she became a writer, the highs and lows of starting out on a writing career, and her novel, Monument 14.

Orchard Books

The Magical Detectives and the Forbidden Spell

Brian Keaney
Authors:
Brian Keaney
Orchard Books

The Haunting of Nathaniel Wolfe

Brian Keaney
Authors:
Brian Keaney

It's seven o'clock on a cold, London evening and in a grubby theatre down by the docks, Nathaniel Wolfe watches as his father - the greatest medium in London - takes to the stage. Which of the dead will speak through him tonight? What Nathaniel doesn't know is that his father is meddling with things he does not understand, things he cannot control. Before the night is over a chilling new world will open for Nathaniel, leading him into a mystery that can only be solved from beyond the grave...A thrilling story of the supernatural set among the winding streets of Victorian London.

Orchard Books

Jacob's Ladder

Brian Keaney
Authors:
Brian Keaney

A boy wakes up in the middle of a field. He cannot remember how he came to be there or even who he truly is. All he knows for certain is his name, Jacob.This is the story of a journey through fear towards hope, a choice between a past you cannot remember and a future you cannot predict.

Orchard Books

The Magical Detectives

Brian Keaney
Authors:
Brian Keaney

When Otto returns home from school one day to find his mother missing, and then discovers an advert for the Magical Detective Agency, he decides there's nothing for it but to call on their services. In fact, the agency is just one man, a strange character call Maximillan Hawksmoor, who becomes convinced that Otto's mother has been abducted by Elementals - beings who live in a completely different world. It's not long before Otto, plus his friend Juliet and her cat Cornelius, join Max on a strange and dangerous journey to rescue Otto's mother - in a world where anything is possible...

C.G. Drews

C.G. Drews lives in Australia with her dog, a piano, and the goal of reading every book in existence. Consequently, her brain has overflowed with words and she spends her days writing novel after novel. She blogs at paperfury.com, never sleeps, and believes in cake for breakfast.

Kay Barnham

Kay Barnham was born in Barrow-in-Furness, grew up in Carlisle, went to college in Brighton, and lived in Hove for a while, before sailing for Kinsale, Co Cork, popping back to Hove and then moving to the New Forest with her husband and daughter. And never at any point has she lived more than ten miles from the sea. She began working in children's publishing in 1992. She was an editor first of all, working on illustrated non-fiction and learning fun facts like how long it would take to walk to the moon - nine years - and how to spell palaeontology. Next, she commissioned fiction titles, editing picture books, storybooks and novels. And then she got the chance to write her own books, which she thinks is quite the best job ever. Except possibly being a chocolatier. She writes non-fiction as Kay Barnham. Her specialist subjects include ice-skating, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, lightning, fairies, Roald Dahl, Sir Isaac Newton, Christmas, dolphins, Florence Nightingale and very bad cracker jokes. And chocolate. She also writes fiction as Kay Woodward, including the Skate School series for Usborne and the novels Jane Airhead and Wuthering Hearts for Andersen Press. Altogether, she's written about a hundred books. Her favourite colour is navy blue. Her favourite chocolate is 85% cocoa solids.

Margaret Nash

Margaret Nash grew up in the industrial West Riding of Yorkshire, and, as a child, was always fascinated by a sense of place, whether in the mill or on the moors. She has worked as a children's librarian in London and the home counties, has two grown-up sons, and now lives in rural Bedfordshire with a lazy lovable cat.

Martin Ford

Martin Ford is editor of Carpworld, the UK's leading carp fishing magazine, and has written for magazines around the world on all aspects of fishing. He has more than 40 years of angling experience.

Matthew Syed

Matthew Syed is a columnist for The Times, an acclaimed author and a former international table tennis champion. He is also a trustee of Greenhouse Sports, a charity that empowers young people from disadvantaged communities through sport. Matthew is married, and has two young children.

Michelle Lovric

Michelle Lovric divides her time between a flat on the Thames and Venice. She has published three novels for adults, of which THE REMEDY was longlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. She combines her fiction work with editing, designing and producing literary anthologies including her own translations of Latin and Italian poetry. Her book 'Love Letters' was a New York Times best-seller. She maintains large databases of text and visual material on memoirs, love poems and letters, female and male wit, slang/cursing/archaic words and esoteric medical matters.Her children's books can be found at http://www.michellelovric.com/children/chindex.htm

Mike Gordon

Mike Gordon is an ever-popular and award-winning cartoonist. He has produced over 500 cards for Hallmark and over 300 picture books for various publishers. His talent has been rewarded with numerous awards inlcuding Berol cartoonist of the year (1988) and runner up for the Trento Fra realto e Follia (1990). He was also nominated for the Silver Quill Award (Germany, 1991) and for the Book and Magazine Illustrator of the Year by the National Cartoonists Society (1995).

Nathan Reed

Nathan Reed has been a professional illustrator since graduating from Falmouth College of Arts in 2000. Recent books include How to Write Your Best Story Ever and the Marsh Road Mystery Series. His latest picture book written by Angela McAllister, is Samson the Mighty Flea. He was also shortlisted for the Serco Prize for Illustration in 2014. When he's not illustrating he can be found with his two boys and a football on Peckham Rye Common.

Nick Lake

Nick Lake was born in Britain but grew up in Luxembourg, where his father worked for the European Parliament. Nick works in publishing by day and writes in every spare moment he can find. He has won the prestigious Printz Award for his novel In Darkness, and has been twice-shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal.Nick lives in a picture-postcard village in Oxfordshire with his wife and family. His long commute to work gives his imagination time to explore places he's never visited.

Patrice Lawrence

Patrice Lawrence was born in Brighton and brought up in an Italian-Trinidadian household in Mid Sussex. Patrice lives in east London and shares a cat called Stormageddon. She has been writing for as long as she has been reading. She loves crime fiction, sci-fi and trying to grow things. Her ideal mixtape includes drum 'n' bass, Bruce Springsteen and Studio Ghibli soundtracks. Music can't help creeping into her books. Her debut novel, Orangeboy, won the Waterstone's Book Prize for Older Readers and the YA Book Prize, and her second novel, Indigo Donut, won the Crime Fest Best Crime Fiction for Young Adults and was shortlisted for the YA Book Prize. @LawrencePatrice

Richard Brassey

Richard Brassey is the author and illustrator of a host of colourful and original non-fiction books for children, among them the bestselling Nessie the Loch Ness Monster and The Story of Scotland, which won the TES/Saltire Society Award. He lives in Essex. Visit his website at http://www.richardbrassey.com.

Richard Spilsbury

Richard Spilsbury has worked in educational publishing for more than 20 years and has written on a variety of subjects, from climate change and food and farming to art history and design.

Richard Williams

Richard Williams is the chief sports writer for the Guardian and the bestselling author of The Death of Ayrton Senna and Enzo Ferrari: A Life. He is a lifelong fan of Nottingham Forest.Richard Williams is a rock critic who has assumed a significant status in popular culture and whose commentaries have helped to cast light, not just on the music, but on our times. A potent force in British rock journalism from the late 1960s and into the 1980s, he is today he holds the post of chief sports writer on the Guardian, but his early professional years were spent preaching the rock - and jazz - gospel. From 1969 to 1973, he worked on Melody Maker, latterly as Deputy Editor. From 1973-1976 he served Island Records in an A&R role. From 1976-1978, he edited Time Out, and returned to Melody Maker as Editor from 1978-1980. He was the first presenter on 'The Old Grey Whistle Test,' wrote for Let It Rock and Streetlife, acted as pop and jazz reviewer on the Times, and wrote books on Phil Spector, Bob Dylan and Miles Davis.

Sally Gardner

Sally Gardner is an award-winning novelist from London. Her books have been translated into 22 languages and have sold more than one million copies in the UK. Her historical novel for older readers, I, Coriander, won the Smarties Children's Book Prize in 2005. Two thrillers both set at the time of the French Revolution, The Red Necklace and The Silver Blade, which was shortlisted for the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize in 2009, followed. Actor Dominic West (The Wire) has bought the film rights to both titles. Her YA novel, The Double Shadow, was published in 2011 to critical acclaim. Sally Gardner's stories for middle readers include Lucy Willow and the popular Magical Children series of six titles: The Strongest Girl in the World, The Invisible Boy, The Boy with Magic Numbers, The Smallest Girl in the World, The Boy with the Lightning Feet, and The Boy who could Fly, which are also available as audio books. She has also written and illustrated picture books including The Fairy Catalogue, The Glass Heart, The Book of Princesses and Playtime Rhymes. Sally Gardner continues to be an avid spokesperson for dyslexia, working to change the way it is perceived by society. She is dyslexic and argues that it is not a disability, but a gift.Her website is www.sallygardner.net and you can follow her on Twitter @TheSallyGardner

Sara Holland

Sara Holland grew up in small-town Minnesota among hundreds of books. After graduating from university, she worked in a tea shop, a dentist's office, and a state capitol building before heading to New York to work in publishing. These days, she can be found exploring the city's bookstores and consuming too much caffeine.You can find her at:www.sarahollandwrites.comTwitter - @Sara_HollandInstagram - @sarahollandwrites

Sarah Ridley

Born in Suffolk, Sarah Ridley lives on the Suffolk/Essex border and is a writer and editor of educational books for children and young people. Recently, a life-long interest in history has led her to write books about the First World War, inspired by reading letters written by soldiers who served in the conflict. Brothers at War tells the story of uncovering the material held in her own family's archives. Dear Jelly sets letters written by soldier brothers to their younger sisters at its core. Teenage children keep Sarah busy when she isn't tied to her computer, and she relaxes by walking along river estuaries close to her home.