Reg Grant - Why Did Hiroshima happen? - Hachette Children's Group

Why Did Hiroshima happen?

By Reg Grant

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

This insightful series that presents some of the most important events in modern history, from World War I to the Cold War.

Read about how in the early morning hours of 6 August 1945, a B-29 bomber headed for the Japanese city of Hiroshima to drop an atomic bomb. The aftermath of the bombing still affects the city's inhabitants today. This book details the events of Hiroshima and explains why this haunting event occurred. Photographs from the period provide an informative view of this tragedy.

Moments in History is an insightful series that presents some of the most important events in modern history. From World War I to the Cold War, readers are encouraged to think critically about the effects these watershed moments have had on the world. Written in a straightforward, engaging style, the books include first-hand speeches, letters, diary entries and other primary source materials that give dramatic clues to the reasons these unforgettable events unfolded as they did. Photographs from the time period show the world as it was at that moment, and the views of professional historians are included in each chapter.

Encourages readers at KS3 and KS4 to think critically about the effect Hiroshima has had on the world.

Biographical Notes

Reg Grant trained as an historian at Oxford University. He then worked as a language teacher in Paris and Lisbon before returning home to become a freelance writer. His books for Hodder Wayland include several volumes in the New Perspectives series.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780750284103
  • Publication date: 10 Dec 2015
  • Page count: 48
  • Imprint: Wayland
Detailed and well researched, with good use of photographs and interesting additional information. — School Librarian
Wayland

Why did World War I happen?

Reg Grant
Authors:
Reg Grant

World War I, a war that lead to the deaths of 15 million people, started with the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand of Austria on June 28, 1914. How did the assassination of one leader result in armed conflict involving more than 20 countries from multiple continents? The answer to this question and more is revealed in this book, which combines primary source documents with other features to provide an unbiased look at the events of World War I.

Alan Gibbons

Alan Gibbons is a full-time writer and a visiting speaker and lecturer at schools, colleges and literary events nationwide, including the major book festivals: Edinburgh, Northern Children's Book Festival, Swansea, Cheltenham, Sheffield and Salford. Alan is a key supporter of a high-profile, nationwide campaign to champion libraries and librarianship and to reevaluate government commitment to educational spending. He lives in Liverpool with his wife and four children. Alan is an honorary CILIP member.Visit Alan's website at www.alangibbons.com, read his blog at alangibbons.net, follow him on Twitter @mygibbo, Facebook www.facebook.com/alan.gibbons.35 and Flickr www.flickr.com/people/71279646@N08.

Anita Naik

Anita Naik is a freelance writer and the author of 50 books, as well as being a mum of two. She is currently the agony aunt on Woman's Own magazine, and a contributor to a number of parenting sites, including the Huffington Post, writing about education, bullying, sex education and teenagers. She can be found tweeting @AnitaNaik or at www.anitanaik.co.uk.

Annabel Pitcher

Annabel graduated from Oxford University with a degree in English Literature and an ambition to be a children's author. She had a variety of jobs before deciding to travel the world and focus on writing. Annabel now lives in Yorkshire with her husband and two young sons.Her first book, MY SISTER LIVES ON THE MANTELPIECE, won the Branford Boase and a Betty Trask Award in 2012 and KETCHUP CLOUDS won the 2014 Waterstones Children's Prize. Annabel's work has been shortlisted for numerous prestigious awards including the Dylan Thomas Prize, the Galaxy British Book Award and the Red House Children's Book Award and longlisted for the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize and the 2012 CILIP Carnegie Medal.Visit Annabel's website at www.annabelpitcher.com and follow her on Twitter @APitcherAuthor.

Annabelle Lynch

Annabelle Lynch is a freelance writer who lives in London. She specialises in young non-fiction, with a particular interest in natural history and geography.

Anne Rooney

I write short books for short children and longer books for longer people. I've been writing fiction and non-fiction for young people, and non-fiction since the last millennium - luckily, the end of the last millennium and I'm not even nearly 1000 years old. I particularly enjoy reading and writing stories with a bit of a twist and, for older readers, an element of horror. I definitely have a Gothic streak. Writers I really admire include Minnie Gray, Oliver Jeffers, Shaun Tan, Edward Gorey, Tove Jansson, Marcus Sedgwick, Siobhan Dowd and Melvin Burgess. I love being a writer because (a) it gives me the chance to be enthusiastic about things and share my enthusiasm with other people (b) I get paid for telling lies and (c) I don't have to do as I'm told, unlike people with a real job. I like to listen to music when I'm writing, and usually pick a few pieces of music that go with each book and listen to them again and again - most of them are opera.Although I spend most of my time writing, I also spend some helping other people with their own writing - mostly young people, who are doing a degree at university. This is great fun as I get to read lots of stories by writers who are just starting. I live in Cambridge, which is a very ancient city in the east of England with lots of ornate and pointy buildings. It's very flat in Cambridge, so it's easy to go everywhere by bicycle, but it's also rather wet. If I could live anywhere at all, it would probably be in Venice, which is also flat, ancient and full of pointy buildings. It's even wetter than Cambridge, and people go everywhere by boat.

Chloe Bennet

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Chris d'Lacey

Chris d'Lacey is the author of the The Last Dragon Chronicles and the Dragons of Wayward Crescent series. He likes dragons. He was born in Malta, but now lives in Devon with his wife, Jay, and about three hundred teddy bears. He likes teddy bears, too. After graduating from York University with a Biology degree, he went to Leicester University where he worked for twenty-eight years as a research scientist, mainly looking down microscopes. He now writes full time.In his spare moments, he likes to watch TV and walk by the sea - though not necessarily at the same time. His passion is writing and recording songs. His ultimate ambition is to write a song that will feature on the soundtrack of a movie of the dragon books, always assuming a movie is made.Presently, he is working on two new projects, both of which feature dragons to some extent.

Christopher Pike

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Nick Sharratt

Nick graduated from St Martin's School of Art in 1984 and has been working as an illustrator ever since. His work encompasses books for babies through to books for earlyteens and he has produced around 150 books to date. He is perhaps best-known for his illustrations for the multi-million selling author Jacqueline Wilson, but as well as this, he writes his own picture books and collaborates with various reputed picture book writers, on books such as PANTS and EAT YOUR PEAS.Recent awards include the Children's Book Award, Sheffield Children's Book Award, The Stockport Schools Award, the Experian Big Three Award. He has also been nominated for the 2003 Kate Greenaway Prize.

Paul Rockett

Since landing on planet Earth, Paul Rockett has spent much of his time reading up on the adventures of human life, while also experiencing a few of his own. In his quest to find out more about his chosen home planet, Paul has travelled, doodled, eaten a lot of food, plundered dusty libraries and gazed out of windows. Having gathered together a vast amount of fascinating data, it is now his mission to present as much as he can in interesting ways, so that any passing Martian can see how brilliant life is on Earth.

Peter Hepplewhite

Peter Hepplewhite is an experienced writer of children's history and has taught the subject for many years. He is currently the Education Officer for Tyne & Wear Archives Service.

Peter Riley

Peter Riley was a science teacher for 25 years, 17 of them as Head of Science. His first book was published in 1981, and he has been a full-time author since 1996, with over 200 books published for children, students and teachers. He is the winner of the prestigious Schoolbook Award for Science in 2000, as well as being shortlisted for the Aventis Science Prize 2004 and nominated for the Educational Resources Award in 2009.

Polly Peters

Polly Peters is a former English and drama teacher and community theatre writer and director. With Andrew Fusek Peters she has produced over 40 books. POEMS WITH ATTITUDE and POEMS WITH ATTITUDE UNCENSORED were both Education Guardian book of the week. She and Andrew live with their two children in rural Shropshire.

R J Anderson

Rebecca Anderson was born in Uganda, raised in Ontario, went to school in New Jersey, and has spent much of her life dreaming of other worlds entirely.As a child she immersed herself in fairy tales, mythology, and the works of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien and E. Nesbit; later she discovered more contemporary authors like Ursula LeGuin, Patricia A. McKillip and Robin McKinley, and learned to take as much pleasure from their language as the stories they told. Now married and the mother of three young sons, Rebecca reads to her children the classic works of fantasy and science fiction that enlivened her own childhood, and tries to bring a similar sense of humour, adventure, and timeless wonder to the novels she writes for children and young adults.

Richard Brassey

Richard Brassey is the author and illustrator of a host of colourful and original non-fiction books for children, among them the bestselling Nessie the Loch Ness Monster and The Story of Scotland, which won the TES/Saltire Society Award. He lives in Essex. Visit his website at http://www.richardbrassey.com.

Rob Colson

Rob Colson is an author and editor of a wide range of books for children and adults, including many natural history, maths and science titles. Previous titles as author: Wayland: Ultimate Cars, Ultimate Machines (Wayland); Super Science (Franklin Watts). Other titles: Bone Collection: Animals (published by Scholastic), Puzzles, Conundrums and Enigmas (published by Parragon). Contributing author to Battle (DK).

Robert Muchamore

ROBERT MUCHAMORE was born in Islington in 1972. As a teenager he dreamt of either becoming an architect, a photographer or a writer. On discovering that architects have to train for seven years and after quitting his Saturday job in a camera shop, he saved up enough money to buy a word processor and set his heart on writing. The only problem was, he didn't know what to write. So, he found a regular job and spent thirteen years as a private investigator. He was inspired to start writing again by his nephew's complaints about the lack of anything decent to read. Robert's CHERUB and Henderson's Boys series are bestsellers around the world. Robert grew up listening to mix tapes sent to him by his older brother, developing tastes for indie bands like Joy Division, The Pogues and The Smiths. The idea for Rock War came from seeing that many of Robert's fans turned up at book signings wearing the logos of long dead rock bands, and a realisation that his online fan forum had more kids talking about the X-Factor than about his books. For more information, go to www.muchamore.com.

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Ross was born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1972.As he grew up he was fond of drawing and precariously swinging backwards on chairs.He graduated from the Glasgow School of Art in 1994 with a First in Illustration. In the same year he won the MacMillan Children's Book Prize.Ross spends his time writing and illustrating children's books, walking by Loch Lomond and precariously swinging backwards on chairs. Ross can also be found scaring small children at book festivals and schools. Ross has won many awards, and 'THE ELEPHANTOM' has been shortlisted for the Kate Greenaway Medal 2007.